Diversity

Gateway Community & Technical College is committed to creating a campus environment that values the exploration, appreciation, and celebration of diversity while promoting inclusiveness, multiculturalism, and global awareness. 

The college defines diversity as recognizing, appreciating, valuing, and utilizing the unique talents and contributions of all individuals, regardless of differences such as race/ethnicity, religion, gender identity, nationality, physical/mental ability, socio-economic status, education, age, and sexual orientation. 

Gateway's Diversity & Inclusion Plan (2017 - 2022)

Gateway Community & Technical College has developed a comprehensive strategic plan for diversity and inclusion that focuses on three primary areas: Opportunity, Success, and Impact. Key strategies for these areas include:

OPPORTUNITY STRATEGIES:

O1: Develop and implement strategic marketing and recruitment activities focused on the 5 targeted Kentucky high schools

O2: Develop and implement strategic marketing and recruitment activities focused on the 5 targeted Cincinnati, Ohio high schools

O3: Further develop Super Someday recruitment event to expand reach and recruitment efforts to more students in targeted school districts

O4: Evaluate expanding dual credit program with Holmes High School to provide entry-level job training with completion of short-term credential by high school graduation

O5: Develop and implement partnership with Dohn Community High School in Cincinnati where DCHS students would earn dual credit at Gateway while fulfilling their vocational requirement for high school completion

O6: Develop partnership program with Cincinnati Youth Collaborative (CYC) to provide scholarship support and seamless support services to CYC graduates who enroll at Gateway

O7: Position Gateway as an inclusive, welcoming, and respectful educational experience for LGBTQ populations through improved campus culture, as evidenced by college participation in the Campus Pride Index

O8: Evaluate potential for development of pathways for the enrollment of international students, ESL students, and refugee populations

SUCCESS STRATEGIES:

S1: Increase engagement/participation in student organizations/groups

S2: Develop comprehensive arts and culture programming including exhibits, activities, and events to invite and engage diverse populations on campus

S3: Develop a comprehensive and collaborative case management model between Gateway and both NKY Scholar Houses: Northern Kentucky Scholar House and Lincoln Grant Scholar House to support at-risk, low-income parents in their pursuit of postsecondary education

S4: Develop and/or expand non-academic support services to serve low-income populations

S5: Evaluation and expansion of curriculum that emphasizes inclusion and appreciation of diversity and culture

IMPACT STRATEGIES:

I1: Promote a supportive campus environment for LGBTQ students and employees

I2: Develop infrastructure to provide sustainability of efforts around diversity, equity, and inclusion and ensure these efforts are strategically embedded into programs and services across the institution

I3: Develop and/or identify of professional and personal development opportunities for faculty and staff focused on uncovering implicit biases and improving cultural competence

I4: Develop and/or identify professional and personal development opportunities for students focused on uncovering implicit biases and improving cultural competence

I5: Increase and diversify efforts to attract/recruit a more diverse mix of faculty and staff

Gateway Community & Technical College is a public, 2-year, comprehensive institution within the Kentucky Community and Technical College System (KCTCS). Although the college is located in Northern Kentucky, its geographical location is unique to the State of Kentucky due to its proximity to the Cincinnati Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA). Primarily serving the Kentucky counties of Boone, Campbell, Grant, Kenton and Pendleton, Gateway also serves the broader Cincinnati MSA consisting of 10 additional counties in Ohio and Indiana; six of which are served through reciprocity agreements.

The population of Gateway’s primary 5-county service region is 423,955, with 282,466 (67%) between the ages of 15 and 64. Within this population, 7.39% are underrepresented minorities (URM). For the broader Cincinnati MSA, the overall population is 2.1 million with 1.4 million (67%) between 15 and 64 years of age. Within this broader regional population, 16.48% are URM. There is a significant racial divide between the counties in Kentucky and Ohio, separated by the Ohio River.  As Table 1 shows below, Gateway’s 5-county service region has a URM population of 7.39% compared to Hamilton County at 29.91%.

TABLE 1 – Northern Kentucky/Greater Cincinnati Regional Population

Population

Total

Age 15-64

Underrepresented Minorities %, 15-64

Cincinnati MSA

2,139,466

1,424,655

16.48%

5-County Service Region

423,955

282,466

7.39%

Boone County, KY

127,712

82,940

8.00%

Campbell County, KY

92,066

62,698

6.08%

Grant County, KY

24,757

16,216

3.55%

Kenton County, KY

165,012

110,874

8.70%

Pendleton County, KY

14,408

9,738

2.07%

Hamilton County, OH

804,194

536,018

29.91%

 

Gateway operates three (3) campuses: Boone Campus located in Florence/Boone County, Edgewood Campus located in Edgewood/Kenton County, and the Urban Metro Campus located in Covington/Kenton County.

History of the College

The Kentucky Postsecondary Education Improvement Act of 1997 created the Kentucky Community and Technical College System (KCTCS). Through this legislation, existing community colleges under the University of Kentucky and technical schools under the Cabinet for Workforce Development merged into a single, unified system of two-year postsecondary education. In 2000, the Kentucky General Assembly approved the establishment of a comprehensive two-year college for Northern Kentucky. The Northern Kentucky Community and Technical College District formed in December 2001 through the consolidation of three existing Northern Kentucky technical schools: Northern Kentucky State Vocational School, Northern Campbell Vocational School, and the Henry E. Pogue Health Occupations Center.

The Northern Kentucky Community and Technical College District became Gateway Community & Technical College in September 2002. Effective January 1, 2008, Gateway received initial regional accreditation from the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges and was reaffirmed for regional accreditation in June 2013. Fall enrollment dramatically increased from 3,130 in fall 2007 to a high of 4,857 in fall 2011, an increase of 55%. Over that same period, racial diversity of the student body increased from 7.57% URM in fall 2007 to 14.97% URM in fall 2011.

Gateway remains a young institution, having been officially formed only 15 years ago. This provides significant opportunities to continue to mold the foundation and culture of the institution.

Gateway’s 2017 – 2022 Diversity and Inclusion Plan is an extension of the college’s 2016 – 2022 Strategic Plan, Cultivating Success: Listen, Adapt, Empower. Development of the strategic plan began in spring 2015 with a listening tour led by KCTCS President, Dr. Jay Box during which faculty, staff, students, community partners, and the college’s local Board of Directors were engaged in dialogue on what/whom Gateway Community & Technical College should be in 2022. Other key activities that contributed to the development of the strategic plan between 2015 and 2016 included:

  • KCTCS roundtable session for Northern Kentucky economic region supported by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation
  • Administration of the PACE Campus Climate Survey
  • College training/introductory session on design thinking that included the identification of institutional values
  • Appointment of 25 faculty and staff to serve on design teams, who used the design thinking process to identify key concepts for how the college could carry out the strategic plan
  • A planning meeting with the Gateway Board of Directors.

During this time, Gateway reviewed other key regional plans to ensure the college’s direction aligned with collective efforts in Northern Kentucky/Greater Cincinnati. After 14+ months of planning, Gateway’s 2016-2022 Strategic Plan was finalized. This 6-year plan contains five (5) strategic goals:

Goal #1: Strategically position Gateway Community & Technical College within the comprehensive educational landscape of the Northern Kentucky/Greater Cincinnati Region

Goal #2: Develop innovative opportunities for flexible, affordable, and personalized learning

Goal #3: Cultivate an experiential, collaborative, and supportive learning environment that pursues diversity, thrives on innovation, and contributes to a connected community

Goal #4: Develop comprehensive, customizable, and fluid educational pathways that are relevant and responsive to the dynamic needs of the region

Goal #5: Strengthen long-term institutional growth and stability

Gateway’s current President/CEO, Dr. Fernando Figueroa, assumed his role in August 2016. By October 2016, he had revamped Gateway’s Diversity and Inclusion Team and made formal appointments of membership. Dr. Figueroa’s charge to the team was as follows:

The Diversity and Inclusion Team will provide leadership for the enhancement and sustainability of an inclusive and diverse community of learners. The team will be a catalytic agent for:

  • Recruitment and retention of diverse students
  • Providing continuous diversity and cultural enhancement for faculty, staff, administration, students, and the community served by Gateway
  • Supporting multicultural students in the integration into the college environment and in the identification and removal of barriers to success
  • Identifying opportunities and developing outreach for the underrepresented/underserved populations
  • Promoting cultural exchange across all Gateway learning environments
  • Developing and implementing strategies within the Diversity Strategic Plan

The expected outcome of the work of this team will be to develop specific goals, tactics, and monitor progress related to diversity/inclusion as part of the Diversity Strategic Plan.

Membership of the Diversity and Inclusion Team is cross-disciplinary. It consists of 16 individuals from various divisions/departments and levels across the college, as well as the President/CEO as an ex-officio member. These individuals include:

TEAM MEMBER

TITLE/DEPARTMENT REPRESENTATION

Fares da Silva

Associate Professor, Spanish

Alex Duvall

Student Success Specialist/Early Alert Manager

Dr. Fernando Figueroa

President/CEO & Ex-Officio Member

Tyneah Harris

Senior Administrative Assistant, Student Development

Colleen Heneghan

Coordinator of Student Engagement and Retention

Dr. Yohanes Honu

Professor of Biological Sciences

Chelsea Law

Mathematics Instructor

Juliana McGuinn

Underserved Populations Program Coordinator

Steve Popple

Director, Knowledge Management

Calvin Robinson

Enrollment Counselor

Judy Schilling

Student Affairs Specialist

Wendy Schindler

Academic Advisor for Pre-Nursing

Kristen Smitherman-Voltaire

Interim Director of Diversity and Inclusion

Ingrid Washington

Vice President for Student Development

Phyllis Yeager

Director, Human Resources

Sarah Young

Community Resource Success Coach

The Team began meeting in November 2016 to review expectations for the Diversity and Inclusion Plan and to begin formulating a vision for diversity and inclusion at Gateway. In early January 2017, the Team divided into three sub-teams to focus on the key sections of the plan: Opportunity, Success, and Impact.

Opportunity Sub-Team

Success Sub-Team

Impact Sub-Team

Tyneah Harris

Colleen Heneghan

Dr. Yohanes Honu

Kristen Smitherman-Voltaire

Phyllis Yeager

Fares da Silva

Chelsea Law

Juliana McGuinn

Steve Popple

Calvin Robinson

Wendy Schindler

Alex Duvall

Judy Schilling

Ingrid Washington

Sarah Young

In December 2016 and January 2017, these sub-teams each reviewed the 2016-2022 Strategic Plan through the lens of their focus area (Opportunity, Success, or Impact), identified and conducted interviews with internal and external stakeholders, compiled feedback collected from these interviews, and incorporated all feedback into the Diversity and Inclusion Plan. In addition, the Team collaborated with other internal Gateway committees and departments tasked with implementing various aspects of the Strategic Plan, such as the Strategic Enrollment Management (SEM) Team (responsible for developing strategies to increase overall enrollment), and the CARE Team (responsible for promoting a safe and supportive environment). This ensured the Diversity and Inclusion Plan was comprehensive, strategic and aligned with related yet distinctive efforts undertaken at the college.

In February 2017, the Team developed and electronically distributed a short survey to students, faculty, and staff to gain initial feedback on how the Gateway community feels about the college’s current efforts to cultivate and support an environment conducive to diversity and inclusion. A total of 273 responses were received: 117 students, 12 administrators, 73 staff, and 71 faculty.

Key insights/themes gleaned from the survey included:

  • The college should increase the diversity of the campus population.
  • The college needs to improve the extent to which it celebrates and recognizes diversity
  • The college should improve upon building a welcoming atmosphere that is tolerant and accepting of others where people feel safe and valued.
  • The campuses need a space for the exchange of ideas, recognizing the diversity we can see and the diversity we cannot see.
  • The college should increase diversity-related events.
  • The college should dedicate resources to diversity.
  • The college should incorporate greater diversity in the curriculum.
  • The college needs to provide more faculty and staff development related to cultural competence and diversity/inclusion.
  • The term diversity can have a negative connotation. To some respondents the word conjured up divisiveness rather than bringing people together.
  • There is a segment of the college community that does not believe celebrating diversity is important.

In addition to the interviews, survey, and work completed as a Team, members each worked individually to research and gather information for the plan. Members of the Diversity and Inclusion Team also met with members of the Strategic Enrollment Management (SEM) Team to align the targets and strategies for both plans, ultimately identifying college-level performance measures with disaggregations that account for various populations (i.e. African American, Hispanic, and low-income). This combined work will be incorporated into am in-house college-wide technology-based platform that will allow continuous tracking of progress toward identified targets.

“Colleges and universities that close gaps in attainment and increase student success do not implement one or two programs or best practices to achieve these results. Rather, they take a holistic approach to create a culture focused on completion, equity, and quality.”

– Lumina Foundation

 

The foundation of the Diversity and Inclusion Plan focuses on taking the college’s learning environment and culture to a new level, creating a shift in mindset away from “equality” and toward “equity”, ensuring that personalized supports are in place to help students succeed, and creating an inclusive environment where both the diversity – that which can be seen and that which cannot be seen – is celebrated. Target populations included at various levels within this plan are: underrepresented minorities with a specific focus on African American and Latino/Hispanic populations; low-income; LGBTQ; and international, ESL and refugee populations.

DEFINITIONS & GUIDING PRINCIPLES

Gateway has adopted the definitions of key terms relating to elements of diversity and inclusion throughout this plan, as defined by the Kentucky Council on Postsecondary Education (CPE). These definitions, which provide context for the plan, are as follows:

Culture: A distinctive pattern of beliefs and values that develop among a group of people who share the same social heritage and traditions.

Cultural Competence: An ability to interact effectively with people of different cultures. A culturally competent individual has an awareness of one’s own cultural worldview; possesses knowledge of different cultural practices and worldviews; and possesses cross-cultural skills to better interact with those from other cultures.

Diversity: People with varied human characteristics, ideas, world views, and backgrounds. Diversity in concept expects the creation by institutions of a safe, supportive, and nurturing environment that honors and respects those differences.

Equity: The creation of opportunities for historically underrepresented populations to have equal access to and participate in educational programs.

Fidelity: Faithfulness in implementing programs or strategies as they were designed. Evidence of fidelity may include, but would not be limited to, the following: dedicated staff (i.e. number of staff, their level of expertise, professional development opportunities, mentoring and coaching, etc.); specific examples of student or staff participation; data collected on strategy inputs and outputs; participation rate of students; dedicated funding; development of implementation timetables and milestones achieved; and narrative descriptions of the implementation process.

Inclusion: The active, intentional, and ongoing engagement with diversity – in the curriculum, in the co-curriculum, and in communities (intellectual, social, cultural, geographic) with which individuals might connect – in ways that increase awareness, content knowledge, cognitive sophistication, and empathetic understanding of the complex ways individuals interact within systems and institutions.

Low-Income: Pell recipients at entry or during specific semesters (varies depending on the specific metric).

Underrepresented Minority (URM): Students who categorize themselves as Hispanic/Latino, American Indian or Alaskan Native, Black or African American, Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander, or Two or More Races.

The following Guiding Principles are the foundation of the Council on Postsecondary Education’s strategic agenda and shape the priorities that guide decisions about the Commonwealth’s promotion of diversity, equity and inclusion:

  • The recognition of diversity as a vital component of the state’s educational and economic development.
  • An affirmation of the long-standing commitment to the enrollment and success of Kentucky’s African-American students at public colleges and universities.
  • The challenging of stereotypes and the promotion of awareness and inclusion.
  • Support for community engagement, civic responsibility, and service that advance diverse and underserved populations/groups.
  • Increased success for all students, particularly those from historically disadvantaged backgrounds who have exhibited a lower rate of retention, persistence and graduation than the total student population.
  • The nurturing and training of students with the ability to interact effectively with people of different cultures (i.e. cultural competence).
  • The preparation of a workforce that is diverse, culturally competent, and highly educated in a global economy.
  • The creation of an inclusive environment on our campuses.

Additional definitions that speak to the LGBTQ population include:

Ally: A person who supports and respects members of the LGBTQ community.

Biological Sex: A medical term used to refer to the chromosomal, hormonal, and anatomical characteristics used to classify an individual as female, male, or intersex. Often simply referred to as sex. Sex is commonly but incorrectly equated with gender.

Gender Identity: An individual’s internal sense of gender (which may or may not correspond to their sex assigned at birth). Often simply referred to as gender. Gender is commonly but incorrectly equated with sex.

LGBTQ: An acronym commonly used to represent diverse sexualities and genders (DSG). Although the acronym is derived from the terms Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer, and Questioning, this plan will use it as an umbrella term for all DSG identities.

Sexual Orientation: An individual’s capacity to feel attraction (sexual, romantic, and/or emotional) towards others, generally labeled based on the gender relationship between that person and the people to whom they are attracted.

Transgender: Identification as a gender other than that assigned at birth.

CURRENT DIVERSITY AND INCLUSION STRATEGIES

Gateway is currently implementing several strategies to support and imbed diversity and inclusion throughout the organization. The college plans to enhance each of these existing strategies through implementation of its Diversity and Inclusion Plan to strengthen its ability to support and engage diverse populations. These strategies include:

  • Cultivating relationships with champions for diversity and inclusion: The college collaborates with key community organizations committed to promoting diversity, inclusion, equity, and social justice to provide meaningful programming and cultural exchange. Most recently, Gateway secured funding to host a six-month long Big Read Program, focused on facilitating broad-based community dialogue around the themes in Ernest Gaines’ A Lesson Before Dying. Partners such as the National Underground Railroad Freedom Center, the Kentucky Commission on Human Rights, six county libraries, and several faith-based organizations collaborated on a total of 47 events attended by 2,222 community members, Gateway employees, and students. The program’s theme, Continue the Conversation, marks the continuation of efforts to engage diverse populations in dialogue beyond the program.
  • Diversifying Gateway Foundation sponsorship portfolio: The Vice President of Development and Executive Director of the Gateway Foundation collaborated with several key stakeholders to adjust the annual Foundation budget development process to be more inclusive and thus, impactful. The Development Division created a mechanism for all employees to be able to recommend sponsorship opportunities, especially opportunities to support underrepresented minority-affiliated and/or operated organizations and businesses. Funds in the Foundation sponsorship budget have been earmarked to broaden the diversity of sponsored activities.
  • Promoting a welcoming environment for LGBTQ students and employees: In fall 2016, Gateway received a $300,000 grant for “Project CARE” (Campus Assessment, Response, and Evaluation) to build capacity and infrastructure to support expanded efforts to promote wellness and help-seeking of all students. The grant-funded program is designed to reduce risk factors and increase protective factors that play a critical role in suicide prevention. Project CARE incorporates outreach to vulnerable students, including those identifying as LGBTQ, who are at greater risk for suicide and suicide attempts. In an effort to promote a more inclusive environment, Gateway has established the Gay-Straight Alliance of Gateway (GSAG) student organization and implements ongoing programming in support of the LGBTQ community. Most recently, Gateway served as an official Watch Spot for Northern Kentucky’s first Pride Parade and hosted PRIDE!: A Community of Strength, Love, Inclusion, and Acceptance, an original exhibit, in its Gallery.
  • Incorporating diversity and inclusion into program curricula: Gateway has adopted the American Association of Colleges & Universities’ (AAC&U) Liberal Education and America’s Promise (LEAP) initiative into its curriculum, which focuses on generating more engaged and informed citizens through their college education. LEAP aims to “make excellence inclusive” through its essential learning outcomes, which include “knowledge of human cultures and the physical and natural world”. All general education courses in the Arts and Sciences division at Gateway incorporate the LEAP essential learning outcomes into their curricula to provide a more well-rounded educational experience. Outcomes are evaluated internally through the annual Program Review and externally by SACS, the college’s accrediting body.
  • Earmarking scholarships to support underrepresented minorities: Gateway is committed to providing financial assistance for students who may not otherwise be able to afford college. Its current scholarship program consists of specific scholarships earmarked to support underrepresented minorities and low-income students.
  • Sustaining a dedicated Diversity and Inclusion Team and hiring a Director: Funds have been dedicated to a full-time Director of Diversity, Inclusion, and Community Engagement, who is responsible for leading the Diversity and Inclusion Team, ensuring the plan is implemented, and providing strategic direction to college leadership around diversity and inclusion efforts.
  • Providing comprehensive student support services for students facing non-academic barriers: Gateway’s community resource staff help students facing non-academic barriers via referrals to both on- and off-campus supports. Some of those include helping students apply for state benefits on campus and providing access to Gateway’s on-site food and clothing pantry. Students are also able to receive guidance on securing housing, childcare, transportation, student employment, counseling, tutoring, and peer support.

DIVERSITY AND INCLUSION PLAN STRATEGIES

Gateway’s plan is organized around three key focus areas used by CPE for the state’s Strategic Agenda: Opportunity, Success, and Impact. The following sections provide detail on the college’s plan.

OPPORTUNITY: RECRUITMENT AND ENROLLMENT OF DIVERSE STUDENTS

According to US Census[1] estimates for 2015 (most recent data available), the population of Gateway’s 5-county service region is 423,955, with 282,466 (67%) between the ages of 15 and 64. Within this population, 7.4% are underrepresented minorities. For the broader Cincinnati Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA) of 15 counties in Kentucky, Ohio and Indiana, the overall population is 2.1 million, of which 1.4 million (67%) are between 15 and 64 years of age. Within this population, 16.5% are underrepresented minorities. Table 1 shows a comparison of racial diversity of Gateway enrollment to that of state and regional populations, aged 15-64. This comparison shows that Gateway’s percentage of underrepresented minority student enrollment (11.8%) is well above that of the college’s 5-county service area (7.4%). Further, Gateway’s enrollment from the 5-county area exceeds the 5-county service area populations in every race considered underrepresented minority.  

While Gateway’s recruitment efforts are primarily focused on the college’s 5-county service region in Northern Kentucky, the extended reach into Hamilton County (specifically Cincinnati) provides greater opportunity for increasing the racial diversity of the student population (29.9% URM for Hamilton County compared to 7.4% URM for the 5-county Kentucky service area).

TABLE 1 – Population Estimates for Ages 15-64 Compared to Enrollments, Fall 2015

 

Kentucky

Cincinnati MSA

Hamilton County, Ohio

5-County Service Area

Gateway Enrollment 5-County Service Area

Underrepresented Minority

13.1%

16.5%

29.9%

7.4%

11.8%

American Indian & Alaskan Native

0.2%

0.2%

0.2%

0.2%

0.3%

Black or African American

8.3%

12.2%

25.3%

3.5%

6.3%

Hispanic

3.1%

2.6%

2.6%

2.5%

2.7%

Native Hawaiian & Other Pac. Islander

0.0%

0.0%

0.0%

0.0%

0.1%

Two or More Races

1.5%

1.5%

1.8%

1.2%

2.4%

White

87.7%

83.1%

69.4%

90.3%

85.1%

 

The following strategies and tactics detail Gateway’s plan for addressing Opportunity. A detailed assessment plan for these strategies is located in Appendix B.

STRATEGY O1: Develop and implement strategic marketing and recruitment activities focused on the 5 targeted Kentucky high schools: Boone County High School, Dixie Heights High School, Holmes High School, Lloyd Memorial High School, and Newport High School.

  • Tactic O1.1: Collaborate on the Strategic Enrollment Management (SEM) recruitment events/onsite activities at each high school during the academic year to ensure inclusion of URM populations
  • Tactic O1.2: Collaborate with the targeted high schools to do on-site enrollment events
  • Tactic O1.3: Develop and award a minimum of one freshman scholarship per targeted high school per year

Because the general population in Gateway’s 5-county Northern Kentucky service area is minimally diverse at 7.4%, data[2] related to all of the high schools within that service area was analyzed, leading to the identification of five high schools with the most racially diverse student populations (See Table 2). While Scott High School has a larger overall percentage of URM population, Dixie Heights has a higher number of African American and Hispanic students, which is why Dixie Heights is one of the targeted 5 instead of Scott. (See Appendix A for a complete listing of the racial diversity for all NKY public high schools within Gateway’s 5-county service region). 

TABLE 2 – Racial Diversity of Targeted Northern Kentucky High Schools

High School

2015-16 Total Enroll

Total URM Enroll

African American

Hispanic

Boone County High School

1,378

277

20.1%

103

7.5%

114

8.3%

Dixie Heights High School

1,380

162

11.7%

43

3.1%

64

4.6%

Holmes High School

784

435

55.5%

263

33.5%

100

12.8%

Lloyd Memorial High School

551

160

29.0%

64

11.6%

53

9.6%

Newport High School

406

155

38.2%

88

21.7%

34

8.4%

These five Northern Kentucky high schools are also targets within the college’s Strategic Enrollment Management (SEM) Plan. In addition to the high percentages of minority student enrollment, also serve large numbers of Lower Income, English Learners, and Homeless students (See Table 3).

TABLE 3 – Non-Academic Factors for Targeted Northern Kentucky High Schools

School

2015-16 Total Enroll

Free/Red Lunch

English Learners

Homeless

Boone County High School

1,378

50.1%

5.0%

69

2.0%

28

Dixie Heights High School

1,380

37.3%

2.8%

39

2.8%

39

Holmes High School

784

85.6%

11.6%

91

14.5%

114

Lloyd Memorial High School

551

63.5%

5.6%

31

12.2%

67

Newport High School

406

83.0%

3.9%

16

13.1%

53

TOTAL/AVERAGE

4,499

--

246

301

STRATEGY O2: Develop and implement strategic marketing and recruitment activities focused on the 5 targeted Cincinnati, Ohio high schools: Woodward High School, Shroder High School, West Hills High School, Hughes STEM High School, and Dohn Community High School.

  • Tactic O2.1: Build strategic relationships with Cincinnati Youth Collaborative (CYC)[3], GRAD Cincinnati[4], and Cincinnati public schools through meetings with school personnel, memberships on committees, and attendance at events.
  • Tactic O2.2: Develop marketing and recruitment materials that strategically target Cincinnati public schools.
  • Tactic O2.3: Develop a strategic recruitment campaign that focuses on each targeted high school throughout the academic year.
  • Tactic O2.4: Provide official and unofficial campus and/or program tours for students, families, and counselors within Cincinnati public schools.
  • Tactic O2.5: Streamline admissions processes for students in Cincinnati public schools

Gateway’s recruitment efforts are primarily focused on the college’s 5-county service region in Northern Kentucky. However, the extended reach into Hamilton County (specifically Cincinnati) provides greater opportunity for increasing the racial diversity of the student population (29.9% URM population for Hamilton County compared to 7.4% for the 5-county Kentucky service area). Gateway’s URM enrollment from the 5-county service region (13.5%) has already far exceeded the population diversity of that same region (7.4%). Significant growth in student enrollment from the traditional-aged population will require a regional approach that focuses its engagement and recruitment efforts where the diverse populations exist.

To date, Gateway has not made any significant recruitment efforts in Cincinnati and over the past two years, has not enrolled any graduates from the five targeted Cincinnati public schools. However, the schools and organizations supporting those schools have reached out to Gateway with interest in creating partnerships that can provide Cincinnati high school graduates with more options for postsecondary education in the region. This strategy focuses on collaborating with two key organizations imbedded within the Cincinnati public schools to amplify recruitment efforts across the Ohio River: Cincinnati Youth Collaborative (CYC) and GRAD Cincinnati. Both organizations provide wrap-around services for Cincinnati students to ensure their personal and academic success.

STRATEGY O3: Further develop Super Someday recruitment event to expand reach and recruitment efforts to more students in targeted school districts.

  • Tactic O3.1: Develop comprehensive academic enrichment opportunities, personal development opportunities, and family engagement for the annual event.

Super Someday is an annual student recruitment event designed to bring high school students to campus for tours and to connect with faculty, staff, and other students. Historically the focus has been on recruitment of African American and Hispanic students, but Gateway has broadened the initiative to take a larger regional approach that focuses on exposing high school students and school counselors from a variety of backgrounds to Gateway’s programs and offerings in an interactive way. The program will be developed further over the next five years with 2016-2018 focusing on 11th and 12th grade; 2018-2020 focusing on 9th – 12th grade; and 2020-2022 focusing on 6th – 12th grade. In addition, academic enrichment, personal development, and family engagement elements will be developed and incorporated into the program.

STRATEGY O4: Evaluate expanding dual credit program with Holmes High School to provide entry-level job training with completion of short-term credential by high school graduation.

  • Tactic O4.1: Explore possible program areas for expansion and build action plan to pilot the expansion.

Holmes high school has the lowest college-going rate for their graduates out of all NKY high schools, 147 graduates in 2014-2015, only 50 (34%) went to college. Of those, 10 (20%) enrolled at Gateway. Holmes also has the largest percentage of racial diversity of all NKY high schools (55%). In fall 2015, Gateway and Covington Independent School District designed a technical program in an effort to provide increased education and training opportunities for students. This program provides direct entry into advanced manufacturing programs at Gateway. Courses completed in this program are treated as dual credit for both institutions to award. Students participating in the Gateway/Holmes Advanced Manufacturing Program (AMP) have the opportunity to earn up to 25 college credit hours that include a certificate in welding. This dual credit program creates pathways for students to earn an entry-level college credential by the time they graduate from high school with options to continue to Gateway for additional education. If they choose not to continue, at least those students are completing high school with a college credential and an entry-level skill set that can lead to gainful employment. Since the start of the program, 24 students have enrolled, 6 (25%) of whom were African-American or Latino. This strategy seeks to evaluate the AMP program model and investigate opportunities to expand the model into other program/career areas. Potential program areas for expansion include Nurse Aide, Phlebotomy, and basic Transportation Technologies courses. 

STRATEGY O5: Develop and implement partnership program with Dohn Community High School in Cincinnati where DCHS students would earn dual credit at Gateway while fulfilling their vocational requirement for high school completion.

  • Tactic O5.1: Work with leadership and other school personnel at Dohn Community High School to develop all aspects of the program needed to initiate a pilot.

Dohn Community High School[5] (DCHS) is a tuition-free public charter school in Cincinnati, Ohio whose goal is to provide a quality high school program in a safe, disciplined and caring environment. The school operates a unique credit recovery program that allows students deficient in high school credit to make up this credit during the school day, after school, or during the four-week summer school program held in June.  DCHS approached Gateway about creating a unique partnership where students could spend up to 2-3 days per week in technical programs on Gateway’s Urban Metro Campus that would also fulfill their vocational requirements for high school and create a natural, seamless bridge into Gateway following high school graduation. Dohn is particularly interested in collaborating with Gateway to offer vocational programming in the following areas: Cosmetology, Computer Information Technology (CIT), and Transportation Technology. This potential partnership will be explored and evaluated to determine the viability of the program and, if found to be viable, will be developed for implementation as a pilot program before being taken to scale.

STRATEGY O6: Develop partnership with Cincinnati Youth Collaborative (CYC) to provide scholarship support and seamless support services to CYC graduates who enroll at Gateway.

  • Tactic O6.1: Develop scholarship program that helps to offset costs to CYC graduates and provides further incentive for pursuing postsecondary education
  • Tactic O6.2: Develop a formalized CYC student engagement process to facilitate a seamless transition to Gateway.

In 2016, CYC approached Gateway regarding opportunities to create a partnership that would help break down the barrier of the Ohio River that many students in Cincinnati seem to face. CYC sees Gateway as a viable option for graduates of Cincinnati high schools. Students in CYC’s college access program have a college-going rate of 80% compared to 64% average overall (Strive Partnership, 2016).  In February 2017, Cincinnati State Technical Community College and Cincinnati Public Schools (CPS) announced a new program called Be Great High School Grants. This program is for low-income (Pell-eligible) students graduating from CPS who attend Cincinnati State on a full-time, degree-seeking basis. The grant covers gaps between financial aid and the cost of tuition and books, up to $1,000 for tuition and $1,000 for books. CYC is interested in creating a similar partnership with Gateway.

Within this strategy, Gateway will explore the potential for creating a partnership with CYC and Cincinnati public schools to create a pipeline from Cincinnati high school graduates to Gateway. A major component of this opportunity would be the potential to replicate the support structure used by CYC that has been so successful with high-risk populations. Once a partnership is established and fully functioning, Gateway will look into creating a similar partnership with GRAD Cincinnati.

STRATEGY O7: Position Gateway as an inclusive, welcoming, and respectful educational experience for LGBTQ populations through improved campus culture, as evidenced by college participation in the Campus Pride Index.

  • Tactic O7.1: Use the Campus Pride LGBTQ-friendly report card to identify gaps to inclusion, develop/implement an action plan, and participate in the Campus Pride Index.

The Campus Pride Index[6] is the premier LGBTQ national benchmarking tool for colleges and universities to create safer, more inclusive campus communities. This free tool provides a database of LGBTQ-friendly campuses so prospective students can locate institutions that have placed a priority on improving the academic experience and quality of life for LBGTQ students. The LGBTQ-friendly report card, generated by the self-assessment tool, provides an index/outline of areas to be evaluated and improved to become more inclusive for the LGBTQ community. The main categories of the report card include: LGBTQ Policy Inclusion; LGBTQ Support and Institutional Commitment; LGBTQ Academic Life; LGBTQ Student Life; LGBTA Housing and Residence Life (if applicable); LGBTQ Campus Safety; LGBTQ Counseling and Health; and LGBTQ Recruitment and Retention.

Currently, the only postsecondary institutions in Kentucky listed on the Campus Pride Index are Transylvania University, University of Kentucky, Northern Kentucky University, University of Louisville, Eastern Kentucky University, and Morehead State University. Gateway plans to become listed on the Campus Pride Index by 2020 and will be the first 2-year institution in Kentucky on the list.

STRATEGY O8: Evaluate potential for development of pathways for the enrollment of international students, ESL students, and refugee populations.

  • Tactic O8.1: Comprehensively evaluate existing refugee populations in Northern Kentucky/Greater Cincinnati, including an understanding of how Gateway might serve these populations.
  • Tactic O8.2: Comprehensively evaluate process required for the enrollment of international students, including an understanding of the F-1 visa process with United States Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS).
  • Tactic O8.3: Evaluate need for an international student center/community center to assist prospective students/members of the community with navigating processes and connecting with needed services.
  • Tactic O8.4: Work with regional high schools that have large ESL student populations to determine potential support systems/pathways for entering college.
  • Tactic O8.5: Evaluate opportunity to introduce credit-bearing ESL courses to high schools with large ESL populations as a way to bridge the transition from high school to college
  • Tactic O8.6: Research opportunities to partner with regional universities within the Cincinnati MSA, as well as colleges/universities abroad, to identify opportunities to recruit international students to the college

According to the Pew Research Center (2017), immigrant populations are expected to drive growth in the US working-age population through 2035. The largest segment of working-age adults (born in the US and whose parents were born in the US) is projected to decline from 128.3 million in 2015 to 120.1 million in 2035, a decline of 8.2 million workers. The working-age adult population composed of US-born adults with immigrant parents is projected to increase by 11.1 million from 2015 to 2035. In addition, Pew points out that a critical component of growth in the working age population over the next two decades will be the arrival of future/new immigrants. Working-age immigrant populations arriving in the US are projected to increase by 4.6 million (33.9 million in 2015 to 38.5 million in 2035). Because of the pending decline of current working-age immigrants – due to age, leaving the US, or death – without these new arrivals, the number of working age immigrants in the US would decline by 17.6 million by 2035.

The continued growth of international populations in the NKY/Greater Cincinnati Region is a critical component of economic development. As such, Gateway will investigate opportunities to work with these populations to provide the education and training needed to support the region’s workforce.  A challenge that exists is the difference in requirements for enrollment in the K-12 system and in postsecondary institutions. Some of the forms of identification that are acceptable for K-12 enrollment are not acceptable for postsecondary enrollment. For example, as indicated in the Kentucky Department of Education Guidance on Student Identification Requirements for Initial Enrollment, “other reliable proof” of a student’s identity and age may include items such as the “recording of student’s name and birth in a family Bible or other religious text”; however, this is not acceptable for enrollment at Gateway. Part of the evaluation of potential to serve the international population will include gaining a deeper understanding of the extent to which students become “stuck” following high school and are unable to enroll in a postsecondary institution.

Within the Northern Kentucky public schools from Gateway’s service region, 367 students are enrolled in ESL programs through the high schools. This equates to 3% of the high school population for these schools (12,100 students).  Gateway will evaluate opportunities to expand dual credit offerings (or other arrangements) that provide ESL courses for high school students and help bridge the transition from high school to college.

SUCCESS: STUDENT PERSISTENCE AND COMPLETION

The following strategies and tactics detail Gateway’s plan for addressing Success. A detailed assessment plan for these strategies is located in Appendix B.

STRATEGY S1: Increase engagement/participation in student organizations/groups.

  • Tactic S1.1: Explore the need and feasibility of a common hour/meeting time when all student organizations and groups could meet.
  • Tactic S1.2: Investigate need for additional student groups and organizations that are more specific to culture, i.e. African American Student Union, etc.
  • Tactic S1.3: Re-establish the Gay-Straight Alliance of Gateway (GSAG), recruit students to join (through word of mouth, marketing, social media) and create and implement LGBTQ-friendly activities.
  • Tactic S1.4: Partner with Adult Education/ESL for multicultural events that bridge Adult Education and postsecondary education relationships.

As a commuter college, Gateway has the challenge of getting students involved on campus outside of traditional class times. This strategy focuses on identifying new ways to engage students in meaningful activities at times that are convenient for them. Though Gateway has a number of student organizations, none of them currently relate to the celebration of specific racial/ethnic cultures or multiculturalism. This need will be investigated as part of this plan.

Gay-Straight Alliance of Gateway

LGBTQ students comprise a target population with whom the college struggles to engage. Gateway needs to formalize to help LGBTQ students feel welcomed and accepted. Suicide rates are disproportionately higher for LGBTQ individuals; while LGBTQ youth are four times more likely, and questioning individuals are three times more likely to attempt suicide as their straight peers. With each episode of LGBTQ victimization, such as physical harassment or abuse, the likelihood of self-harming behavior increases by 2.5 times the average suicide rate. (The Trevor Project, 2015).

Gateway’s primary vehicle for reaching the LGBTQ student population is through its grant-funded Project CARE program and the relatively new student organization, the Gay-Straight Alliance of Gateway (GSAG). GSAG and the Project CARE team will collaborate by reviewing materials, policies, and protocols to ensure they are culturally and linguistically appropriate for the LGBTQ population. LGBTQ students will work with Project CARE program staff on how to create a safe and supportive school environment for all students regardless of sexual orientation or gender identity. A positive climate and feeling of connectedness are protective factors that contribute to decreased depression, suicidal feelings and substance abuse.

STRATEGY S2: Develop comprehensive arts and culture programming including exhibits, activities, and events to invite and engage diverse populations on campus.

  • Tactic S2.1: Increase use of Gallery space within the Center for Technology, Innovation, and Enterprise (TIE) as an art and cultural gallery, tied to calendar of key initiatives.
  • Tactic S2.2: Develop partnerships with regional arts and culture organizations to provide more opportunities to engage students and employees in the arts.
  • Tactic S2.3: Identify key regional celebrations related to different cultures and build on those activities by expanding the energy onto campuses (i.e. Cincy-Cinco).
  • Tactic S2.4: Gateway faculty and staff to volunteer at/attend regional cultural events to build relationships and promote the image of the college as an inclusive environment.

The TIE building of the Urban Metro Campus opened in 2014. In the fall of 2016, the college converted a space that had been used for meetings into a gallery for arts and cultural activities. Work will continue to expand the use of this space to celebrate arts and culture. Numerous arts and culture organizations exist throughout the Northern Kentucky/Greater Cincinnati Region and Gateway will work to develop strategic partnerships with some of these organizations, such as The Carnegie[7], Baker Hunt Art and Cultural Center[8], etc. Within the region, there are a number of cultural celebrations that Gateway will begin partnering with to expand those celebrations onto campus, such as Cincy-Cinco[9], Cincinnati’s Latino Festival held in May. To promote the events, build relationships, and create a stronger environment of inclusion, faculty and staff will serve as volunteers at some of these events. This strategy directly connects to diversity by raising awareness of Gateway’s commitment to celebrating the contributions of diverse cultures to our society, cultivating an environment of valuing diversity, and fostering sentiments of belonging and safety in students and employees.

STRATEGY S3: Develop a comprehensive and collaborative case management model between Gateway and both NKY Scholar Houses: Northern Kentucky Scholar House and Lincoln Grant Scholar House to support at-risk, low-income parents in their pursuit of postsecondary education.

  • Tactic S3.1: Develop a formal, concrete, collaborative process (i.e. regularly scheduled meetings, case management plans, etc.) for scholar house resident enrollment and support.
  • Tactic S3.2: Develop a formal MOU with each scholar house to ensure sharing of data on residents/Gateway students.
  • Tactics S3.3: Develop program to assist in the reduction of financial barriers for incoming Scholar House residents who plan to enroll at Gateway.

The Scholar House is a housing and education initiative with the Kentucky Housing Corporation[10] that enables the head-of-household to reach self-sufficiency. In this model, housing and education components operate as one unit with the requirement that the clients are successfully participating in postsecondary education with affiliated institutions. This model is expanding across Kentucky and within the last 18 months two scholar houses have opened in the river city region of Northern Kentucky. The Northern Kentucky Scholar House, located in Newport, is a collaborative partnership between Neighborhood Foundations[11] and the Brighton Center[12]. The Lincoln Grant Scholar House is a partnership between the Northern Kentucky Community Action Commission, the City of Covington, and a private developer who transformed a historic building that once served as Covington’s public school for African American students in K-12 (until 1965) into a remodeled building for use as a scholar house.

Gateway’s Urban Metro Campus sits between these two scholar houses, which are less than a mile apart. The majority of residents from both scholar houses are Gateway students and Gateway staff and administration serve on the advisory boards for both houses. Gateway has identified a staff member who serves as the single point of contact for both houses and helps to facilitate admissions, enrollment, and other processes for this population, and assists with navigating any barriers that arise. In spring 2017, Gateway’s Ready-to-Work Coordinators served 17 Scholar House students and worked with several additional residents who were referred to Gateway as a result of resident information sessions. This relationship between Gateway and the scholar houses will be strengthened as the partners continue working together sharing data on student progress/success and overall involvement of the college in supporting the students who reside in the scholar houses.

STRATEGY S4: Develop and/or expand non-academic support services to serve low-income population.

  • Tactic S4.1: Evaluate the need for expanding the on-campus clothing closet and food pantry to support students (specifically low-income).
  • Tactic S4.2: Evaluate the need for a location on each campus where students can get support from peer mentors and/or staff to apply onsite for public benefits (low-income population).

Low-income (Pell recipient) students make up more than half of Gateway’s credential-seeking students each year. A comparison of low-income students by race for the last three fall semesters indicates that there is a disparity between racial categories, with the African American population consistently having the highest percentage of low-income students.

Race

Fall 2014

Fall 2015

Fall 2016

African American/Black

82.21%

80.94%

75.95%

Hispanic

46.96%

48.00%

42.75%

White

56.14%

50.92%

48.25%

Overall College

42.4%

45.1%

--

Non-academic supports are critical for low-income students. Of new students enrolling at Gateway in 2016, 15% indicated a concern with meeting housing needs; 13% with grocery/food needs being met; 7% with child care needs being met; and 11% expressed concern regarding transportation.

STRATEGY S5: Evaluate and expand curriculum that emphasizes inclusion and appreciation of diversity and culture.

  • Tactic S5.1: Conduct a curriculum review of each division to identify ways to incorporate and/or verify an emphasis on diversity and inclusion and make necessary revisions.

Gateway has taken steps to incorporate diversity and inclusion into its curriculum. First, all general education courses in the Arts and Sciences division at Gateway incorporate the Liberal Education and America’s Promise (LEAP) Essential Learning Outcomes into their curricula to provide a more well-rounded educational experience. Outcomes are evaluated internally through the annual Program Review and externally by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools (SACS), the college’s accrediting body (with particular attention to the improvements made in the collection process and in the actual courses). Second, there are several programs, such as Human Services and Criminal Justice, that emphasize the importance of evaluating issues from diverse perspectives and broadening one’s thinking to consider different points of view.

While Gateway has laid the groundwork for imbedding diversity and inclusion in both the curricula and instruction of many of its programs, it still behooves the college to evaluate all programs through a lens of diversity and inclusion to ensure our courses and methods of instruction meet the dynamic needs of a diverse student body.           

IMPACT: CAMPUS CLIMATE, INCLUSIVENESS AND CULTURAL COMPETENCY

The college has identified five (5) strategies related to Impact. A detailed assessment plan for these strategies is located in Appendix B.

STRATEGY I1: Promote a supportive campus environment for LGBTQ students and employees

  • Tactic I1.1: Develop and implement a Safe Zone program for Gateway employees.
  • Tactic I1.2: Develop and implement an LGBTQ educational program for Gateway students.
  • Tactic I1.3: Ensure there are easily identifiable all-gender restroom options at each campus.
  • Tactic I1.4: Create a webpage to disseminate information about LGBTQ programs and services at Gateway.

In September 2016, KCTCS released the Final Report from the Gender Neutrality Workgroup, a system-wide group charged by the KCTCS President with creating a proactive approach to investigate legal, admissions/registrar, physical facilities/restrooms, cultural and other issues related to Gender Neutrality. A key recommendation identified in this report, for KCTCS colleges to work toward addressing, was the implementation of a Safe Spaces program, which can contribute to building a campus environment that is a “safe” space for the LGBTQ community. The following data indicate the importance of supporting the LGBTQ population include:

  • 36% of LGBTQ students report experiencing harassment and 79% of those harassed identified other students as the source (Rankin, 2005).
  • 51% of LGBTQ students concealed their sexual orientation or gender identity to avoid intimidation while 20% feared for their physical safety (Rankin, 2005).

Gateway will develop and implement a Safe Zone training program (LGBTQ awareness and ally training workshops) for both students and employees. Trained participants will receive identification to display in their office space to indicate they are an ally and “safe” to approach with LGBTQ-related matters.

Challenge/Limitation: Obtaining even a rough estimate of the number of LGBTQ students or employees is nearly impossible as there are not clear ways to capture this information and even if there were, many individuals within this population may not self-select or identify themselves as part of the LGBTQ community out of fear.

STRATEGY I2: Develop infrastructure to provide sustainability of efforts around diversity, equity and inclusion and ensure these efforts are strategically embedded into programs and services across the institution.

  • Tactic I2.1: Identify/hire a permanent Director of Diversity and Inclusion as part of a recurring budget dedicated to supporting the work outlined within the comprehensive diversity plan
  • Tactic I2.2: Identify key personnel in student-facing areas as Diversity and Inclusion liaisons to support URM students from recruitment to graduation.
  • Tactic I2.3: Collaborate with SEM Team to ensure ongoing communication and implementation of complementary processes.

Efforts to ensure solid alignment between plans and targets for Strategic Enrollment Management and Diversity and Inclusion plans are underway. The focus of this strategy is to ensure not only strong alignment, but also sustainability of efforts related to diversity and inclusion.

STRATEGY I3: Develop and/or identify professional and personal development opportunities for faculty and staff focused on uncovering implicit biases and improving cultural competence.

  • Tactic I3.1: Assess the cultural competence of faculty and staff to obtain a baseline measurement and reassess on a recurring, periodic schedule.
  • Tactic I3.2: Develop comprehensive program to utilize results of cultural competence assessment to build/improve the cultural competence of faculty and staff.
  • Tactic I3.3: Develop and deliver specialized workshops for faculty and staff that focus on uncovering individual implicit biases and learning how to use that information.
  • Tactic I3.4: Provide introductory Spanish workshops (and/or other languages identified as needed) for interested employees.

According to the Kirwan Institute for the Study of Race and Ethnicity at Ohio State University[13], implicit bias “refers to the attitudes or stereotypes that affect our understanding, actions, and decisions in an unconscious manner. These biases, which encompass both favorable and unfavorable assessments, are activated involuntarily and without an individual’s awareness or intentional control. Residing deep in the subconscious, these biases are different from known biases that individuals may choose to conceal for the purposes of social and/or political correctness.” Implicit associations or biases individuals have formed over their lifetime can be gradually unlearned through a variety of techniques. Gateway will make a focused effort on evaluating and developing the cultural competency of faculty and staff; however, to complete this work in a meaningful way requires each employee to understand their own implicit biases and how to improve/undo those mindsets so that collectively the college community can become more inclusive and welcoming. 

STRATEGY I4: Develop and/or identify professional and personal development opportunities for students focused on uncovering implicit biases and improving cultural competence.

  • Tactic I4.1: Administer cultural competency assessments to students; incorporating into curriculum where possible.
  • Tactic I4.2: Investigate the addition of a learning module into the Blackboard shells for online, hybrid, and web-enhanced courses that provides some initial self-reflection or education on implicit bias and cultural competency.

The college will investigate the potential of adding a learning module into Gateway-delivered courses that utilize Blackboard. All Gateway-delivered courses that utilize Blackboard include a “start here” module that students must complete prior to beginning their coursework in the respective courses.

STRATEGY I5: Increase and diversify efforts to attract/recruit a more diverse mix of faculty and staff.

  • Tactic I5.1: Expand targeted recruitment of URM faculty and staff through external channels and partnerships; secure funds needed to expand recruitment efforts.

A challenge to increasing the racial diversity of faculty and staff is the availability of funding needed to expand the college’s workforce. Opportunities for hiring diverse candidates will be limited to position replacements due to resignations and retirements. As positions become available, more aggressive use of outlets that  focus on minority/URM recruitment, such as NKY Chamber of Commerce, KY Focus Talent (KY Career Center), Greater Cincinnati Urban League, Hispanic Chamber of Commerce, African American Chamber of Commerce, as well as add-ons with outlets such as HigherEd Jobs, etc, will be utilized.  Furthermore, through seeking and leveraging diverse sponsorship opportunities (a current tactic to diversify the college’s community engagement), there is a potential for Gateway to implement creative marketing strategies to inform broader audiences about job openings.

[1] Source: US Census http://www.census.gov (as of May 2017)

[2] Source: Kentucky Department of Education

[3] www.cycyouth.org

[4] www.gradcincinnati.org

[5] www.dohnschool.org

[6] Source: www.campusprideindex.org

[7] www.thecarnegie.com

[8] www.bakerhunt.org

[9]www.ciny-cinco.com

[10] www.kyhousing.org/specialized-housing/pages/scholar-house.aspx

[11] www.neighborhoodfoundations.com/properties/scholarhouse.php

[13] http://kirwaninstitute.osu.edu/research/understanding-implicit-bias/

 

The assessment of the Diversity Plan will occur through a comprehensive process that drives continuous improvement throughout the institution. To obtain the most comprehensive picture of effectiveness, the plan will be assessed though three dimensions within a systems design model:

Systems Design: Evaluation of each momentum point along the student pathway, from application to completion, with relevant disaggregation of the student population to determine closure of performance gaps between those populations. The evaluation of each momentum point will occur through the assessment of three dimensions:

  1. Strategic Objectives: Strategic Objectives provide the expected level of performance associated with the respective Performance Measures. These Performance Measures provide an accountability framework at the strategic plan level, serving as the foundation on which detailed strategies are developed and implemented. For each of the main sections of the plan (Opportunity, Success, and Impact), Strategic Objectives, Performance Measures, Baseline, Target and Data Timelines are provided as well as a breakdown of the identified Targets by year.
  2. Action Planning: Action planning details the strategies that will contribute to the achievement of the strategic objectives, the tactics that will contribute to the success of the strategies, the measures that determine the effectiveness of the tactic, as well as the lead/accountable individual, internal/external collaborators, and the timeline for implementation.
  3. Qualitative Assessment of Satisfaction and Engagement: Qualitative assessment will focus on feedback from students and employees related to satisfaction and engagement. Within the assessment of engagement, detailed CCSSE data will be disaggregated by race to provide more in-depth analysis of feedback, allowing the college to target specific areas. The last CCSSE evaluation period was spring 2015 with the next evaluation period occurring in the current spring 2017 semester. Only one year of CCSSE data disaggregated by race has been reviewed, therefore specific targets have not been established at individual question level. Rather, this data will be monitored and used to direct continuous improvement of programs and services.

A detailed Assessment Plan for all strategies and tactics outlined in this document is located in Appendix B.

 

Kentucky Department of Education. (2009). Kentucky Department of Education Guidance on Student Identification Requirements for Initial Enrollment.

Passell, J. & Cohn, D. (2017). Immigration projected to drive growth in U.S. working-age population through at least 2035 (Washington, DC: Pew Hispanic Center, March 8, 2017). Retrieved from: http://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2017/03/08/immigration-projected-to-drive-growth-in-u-s-working-age-population-through-at-least-2035/

Rankin, S.R. (2005). Campus climates for sexual minorities. New Directors for Student Services, 2005(111), 17-23.

Rankin, S., Weber, G., Blumenfield, W., & Frazer, S. (2010). 2010 State of Higher Education for Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual & Transgender People. Retrieved from Campus Pride website: https://www.campuspride.org/wp-content/uploads/campuspride2010lgbtreportssummary.pdf

StrivePartnership. (2016). 2015-2016 Partnership Report. Retrieved from: www.strivepartnership.org/sites/default/files/annual_report_2015-2016.pdf  

The Trevor Project. (2015). Facts about suicide [Data File]. Retrieved from http://www.thetrevorproject.org/pages/facts-about-suicide.

Zubernic, L., & Snyder, M. (2007). Considerations of additional stressors and developmental issues for Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, and Transgender College Students. Journal of College Student Psychotherapy, 22(1), 75.

 

TABLE 2 – Racial Diversity of Northern Kentucky High Schools

High School

2015-16 Total Enroll

Total URM Enroll

African American

Hispanic

BOONE COUNTY

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Boone County High School

1,378

277

20.1%

103

7.5%

114

8.3%

Conner High School

1,373

136

9.9%

62

4.5%

45

3.3%

Cooper High School

1,257

105

8.3%

47

3.7%

23

1.8%

Ryle High School

1,811

203

11.2%

41

2.3%

111

6.1%

Walton Verona High School

521

27

5.2%

5

1.0%

12

2.3%

CAMPBELL COUNTY

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bellevue High School

373

41

11.0%

3

0.8%

15

4.0%

Campbell County High School

1,548

73

4.7%

20

1.3%

27

1.7%

Dayton High School (7-12th)

355

33

9.3%

24

6.8%

8

2.3%

Highlands High School

984

42

4.3%

11

1.1%

17

1.7%

Newport High School

406

155

38.2%

88

21.7%

34

8.4%

GRANT COUNTY

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Grant County High School

1,150

64

5.6%

2

0.2%

35

3.0%

Williamstown High School

228

3

1.4%

1

0.4%

1

0.4%

KENTON COUNTY

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Beechwood High School

642

44

6.8%

4

0.6%

22

3.4%

Dixie Heights High School

1,380

162

11.7%

43

3.1%

64

4.6%

Holmes High School

784

435

55.5%

263

33.5%

100

12.8%

Lloyd Memorial High School

551

160

29.0%

64

11.6%

53

9.6%

Ludlow High School

376

27

7.2%

2

0.5%

10

2.7%

Scott High School

943

280

29.7%

26

2.8%

23

2.4%

Simon Kenton High School

1,748

97

5.5%

15

0.9%

34

1.9%

PENDLETON COUNTY

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pendleton County High Sch

716

14

2.0%

8

1.1%

2

0.3%

 

The full assessment plan/framework for all strategies and tactics within Gateway’s Diversity Plan are provided in the following section. The continuous review of the established targets will occur through the college’s regular institutional effectiveness process each year.

GATEWAY COMMUNITY AND TECHNICAL COLLEGE

DIVERSITY AND INCLUSION

ASSESSMENT FRAMEWORK

2017-2022 

OPPORTUNITY

GATEWAY STRATEGIC PLAN 2016-2022

STRATEGIC GOAL #1

Strategically position Gateway Community & Technical College within the comprehensive educational landscape of the Northern Kentucky/Greater Cincinnati Region

STRATEGIC PRIORITIES:

  • Develop a refined identity and brand that communicates the institution’s unique message, strengths, and contributions to the region
  • Develop comprehensive plan for marketing/advertising and recruitment that utilizes alternative, innovative and nontraditional approaches that uniquely focus on key populations
  • Strategically expand and/or realign innovative programs and services that uniquely position the college to meet the dynamic needs of the region

STRATEGIC GOAL #2

Develop innovative opportunities for flexible, affordable, and personalized learning

STRATEGIC PRIORITIES:

2.1   Increase the efficiency and effectiveness of admissions and enrollment processes, with a focus on increasing student awareness

2.2   Expand innovative partnerships with regional employers to develop more affordable options for educational benefits and work experience

2.3   Increase access to education through flexible and non-traditional models of delivery that provide greater options for personalized learning

STRATEGIC OBJECTIVES

The strategic objectives and performance measures related to underrepresented minority and low-income populations are disaggregations of objectives and measures within the college’s Strategic Enrollment Management Plan. Strategic objectives are organized by Key Performance Indicator, each of which represents a point along the student pathway.

Key Performance Indicators

Strategic Objectives

Performance Measures

Baseline Performance

Target

Method of Assessment

Frequency of Assessment

Applicant Matriculation

Increase the applicant matriculation rate of underrepresented minority applicants by 2% each year (GW)

Applicant Matriculation Rate: The percentage of prospective underrepresented minority students who apply for admission and follow through to enroll (GW)

2015-2016

Fall: 35.31%

Spring: 24.66%

2021-2022

Fall: 50.53%

Spring: 36.66%

DSS/PeopleSoft Student Information System

Evaluated each semester

Data availability:

§   February 1 (fall)

§   June 15 (spring)

Increase the applicant matriculation rate of African American applicants by 2% each year (GW)

Applicant Matriculation Rate: The percentage of prospective African American students who apply for admission and follow through to enroll (GW)

2015-2016

Fall: 31.56%

Spring: 21.51%

2021-2022

Fall: 44.29%

Spring: 33.51%

DSS/PeopleSoft Student Information System

Evaluated each semester

Data availability:

§   February 1 (fall)

§   June 15 (spring)

Increase the applicant matriculation rate of Hispanic applicants by 2% each year (GW)

Applicant Matriculation Rate: The percentage of prospective Hispanic students who apply for admission and follow through to enroll (GW)

2015-2016

Fall: 40.48%

Spring: 30.91%

2021-2022

Fall: 56.34%

Spring: 42.91%

DSS/PeopleSoft Student Information System

Evaluated each semester

Data availability:

§   February 1 (fall)

§   June 15 (spring)

Enrollment

New, first-time URM student enrollment from the 5-county KY service area will meet or exceed 150% of URM population % age 15-64 in the 5-county service area by 2017-2018; 175% by 2019-2020; 200% by 2021-2022*

Enrollment of New, First-Time, URM Students: Percentage of new, first-time underrepresented minority student enrollment as % of total new, first-time student enrollment

Fall 2015

12.90%

65/504

Fall 2021

14.80%*

DSS/PeopleSoft Student Information System

Evaluated each semester

Data availability:

§   February 1 (fall)

§   June 15 (spring)

New, first-time African American enrollment from the 5-county service area will meet or exceed 150% of African American population % age 15-64 in the 5-county service area by 2017-2018; 175% by 2019-2020; 200% by 2021-2022*

Enrollment of New, First-Time, African American Students: Percentage of new, first-time African American student enrollment as % of total new, first-time student enrollment

Fall 2015

6.35%

32/504

Fall 2021

7.00%*

DSS/PeopleSoft Student Information System

Evaluated each semester

Data availability:

§   February 1 (fall)

§   June 15 (spring)

New, first-time Hispanic enrollment from the 5-county service area will meet or exceed 150% of Hispanic population % age 15-64 in the 5-county service area by 2017-2018; 175% by 2019-2020; 200% by 2021-2022*

Enrollment of New, First-Time, Hispanic Students: Percentage of new, first-time Hispanic student enrollment as % of total new, first-time student enrollment

Fall 2015

2.98%

15/504

Fall 2021

5.02%

DSS/PeopleSoft Student Information System

Evaluated each semester

Data availability:

§   February 1 (fall)

§   June 15 (spring)

Increase enrollment of high school graduates from 5 targeted Kentucky high schools with highest percentages of racial diversity

Number of students enrolling at Gateway from each targeted Kentucky high school, within 1 year of high school graduation

2015-2016

TOTAL: 65

2021-2022

TOTAL: 114

DSS/PeopleSoft Student Information System

Evaluated each semester

Data availability:

§   February 1 (fall)

§   June 15 (spring)

Boone County High School

 28

 49

Dixie Heights High School

 14

24

Holmes High School

10

16

Lloyd Memorial High School

10

16

Newport High School

3

9

Increase enrollment of high school graduates from 5 targeted Cincinnati, Ohio high schools

Number of students enrolling at Gateway from each targeted Cincinnati high school, within 1 year of high school graduation

2015-2016

TOTAL: 0

2021-2022

TOTAL: 50

DSS/PeopleSoft Student Information System

Evaluated each semester

Data availability:

§   February 1 (fall)

§   June 15 (spring)

Dohn Community High School

0

10

Hughes STEM High School

0

10

Shroder High School

0

10

West Hills High School

0

10

Woodward High School

0

10

Fall URM enrollment as a percent of total fall enrollment will be equal to the % of URM population in the Cincinnati MSA, age 15-64, by fall 2021 (0.6% each year)*

Enrollment of Underrepresented Minority Students: Fall enrollment of URM students as a percent of total fall enrollment

Fall 2015

13.14%

602/4,583

 

Fall 2021

14.60%*

 

DSS/PeopleSoft Student Information System

Evaluated each semester

Data availability:

§   February 1 (fall)

§   June 15 (spring)

Fall African American enrollment as a percent of total fall enrollment will be equal to the % of African American population in the Cincinnati MSA, by fall 2021 (+0.96% each year)*

Enrollment of African American Students: Fall enrollment of African American students as a percent of total fall enrollment

Fall 2015

7.86%

360/4,583

Fall 2021

10.50%

DSS/PeopleSoft Student Information System

Evaluated each semester

Data availability:

§   February 1 (fall)

§   June 15 (spring)

Fall Hispanic enrollment as a percent of total fall enrollment will be equal to the % of Hispanic population in the Cincinnati MSA, by fall 2021 (maintain %)*

Enrollment of Hispanic Students: Fall enrollment of Hispanic students as a percent of total fall enrollment

Fall 2015

2.60%

119/4,583

Fall 2021

3.70%

DSS/PeopleSoft Student Information System

Evaluated each semester

Data availability:

§   February 1 (fall)

§   June 15 (spring)

Fall URM enrollment from 5-county service area will meet or excel 175% of URM population % age 15-64 in the 5-county service area (+0.15% each year)*

Enrollment of Underrepresented Minority Students: Fall undergraduate enrollment of underrepresented minority students as a percent of total fall undergraduate enrollment, limited to enrollment from 5-county KY service region (GW)

Fall 2015

11.88%

480/4,040

Fall 2021

12.93%

DSS/PeopleSoft Student Information System

Evaluated each semester

Data availability:

§   February 1 (fall)

§   June 15 (spring)

Fall African American enrollment from 5-county service area will meet or exceed 200% of the African American population % age 15-64 in the 5-county service area (+0.27% each year)*

Enrollment of African American Students: Fall undergraduate enrollment of African American students as a percent of total fall undergraduate enrollment, limited to enrollment from 5-county KY service region (GW)

Fall 2015

6.34%

256/4,040

Fall 2021

7.04%

DSS/PeopleSoft Student Information System

Evaluated each semester

Data availability:

§   February 1 (fall)

§   June 15 (spring)

Fall Hispanic enrollment from 5-county service area will meet or exceed 175% of URM population % age 15-64 in the 5-county service area (+0.13% per year)*

Enrollment of Hispanic Students: Fall undergraduate enrollment of Hispanic students as a percent of total fall undergraduate enrollment, limited to enrollment from 5-county KY service region (GW)

Fall 2015

2.67%

108/4,040

Fall 2021

4.39%

DSS/PeopleSoft Student Information System

Evaluated each semester

Data availability:

§   February 1 (fall)

§   June 15 (spring)

*All measures and targets that are based upon regional population demographics will be re-evaluated each year when revised estimates become available from the US Census.

STRATEGIC OBJECTIVES: ANNUAL TARGETS

The strategic objectives provided above are shown here with annual/incremental targets.

Strategic Objectives

2014-2015

BASELINE

2015-2016

BASELINE

2016-2017

TARGET

2017-2018

TARGET

2018-2019

TARGET

2019-2020

TARGET

2020-2021

TARGET

2021-2022

TARGET

KPI: APPLICANT MATRICULATION

Increase the applicant matriculation rate of URM applicants by 2% each year

F: 35.98%

177/492

S: 33.94%

94/277

F: 35.31%

202/572

S: 24.66%

73/296

F: 40.53%

216/533

S: 26.66%

F: 42.53%

 

S: 28.66%

F: 44.53%

 

S: 30.66%

F: 46.53%

 

S: 32.66%

F: 48.53%

 

S: 34.66%

F: 50.53%

 

S: 36.66%

Increase the applicant matriculation rate of African American applicants by 2% each year

F: 28.97%

84/290

S: 30.11%

56/186

F: 31.56%

113/358

S: 21.51%

40/186

F: 34.29%

96/280

S: 23.51%

F: 36.29%

 

S: 25.51%

F: 38.29%

 

S: 27.51%

F: 40.29%

 

S: 29.51%

F: 42.29%

 

S: 31.51%

F: 44.29%

 

S: 33.51%

Increase the applicant matriculation rate of Hispanic applicants by 2% each year

F: 45.28%

48/106

S: 42.86%

18/42

F: 40.48%

34/84

S: 30.91%

17/55

F: 46.34%

57/123

S: 32.91%

F: 48.34%

 

S: 34.91%

F: 50.34%

 

S: 36.91%

F: 52.34%

 

S: 38.91%

F: 54.34%

 

S: 40.91%

F: 56.34%

 

S: 42.91%

KPI: ENROLLMENT

New, first-time URM enrollment from the 5-county service area will meet or exceed 150% of URM population % age 15-64 in the 5-county service area by 2017-2018; 175% by 2019-2020; 200% by 2021-2022*

17.70%

94/531

12.90%

65/504

15.84%

89/562

 

11.1%

12.95%

 

 

12.95%

 

 

14.80%

 

 

14.80%

 

 

New, first-time African American enrollment from the 5-county service area will meet or exceed 150% of African American population % age 15-64 in the 5-county service area by 2017-2018; 175% by 2019-2020; 200% by 2021-2022*

9.04%

48/531

6.35%

32/504

5.34%

30/562

 

5.25%

 

 

6.12%

 

 

6.12%

 

 

7.00%

 

 

7.00%

New, first-time Hispanic enrollment from the 5-county service area will meet or exceed 150% of Hispanic population % age 15-64 in the 5-county service area by 2017-2018; 175% by 2019-2020; 200% by 2021-2022*

4.71%

25/531

2.98%

15/504

5.69%

32/562

 

3.76%

 

 

4.39%

4.39%

5.02%

5.02%

Increase the enrollment of new, first-time students from targeted Kentucky high schools who enroll within one year of high school graduation each year

78

65

72

79

87

96

105

114

§   Boone County High School (+10%/year)

37

28

31

34

37

41

45

49

§   Dixie Heights High School (+10%/year)

15

14

15

16

18

20

22

24

§   Holmes High School (+10%/year)

15

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

§   Lloyd Memorial High School (+10%/year)

8

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

§   Newport High School (+200% by 2021-2022)

3

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

Increase the enrollment of new, first-time students from targeted Cincinnati high schools who enroll within one year of high school graduation each year

0

0

0

5

10

15

20

25

§   Dohn Community High School^

0

0

0

2

4

6

8

10

§   Hughes STEM High School^

0

0

0

2

4

6

8

10

§   Shroder High School^

0

0

0

2

4

6

8

10

§   West Hills High School^

0

0

0

2

4

6

8

10

§   Woodward High School^

0

0

0

2

4

6

8

10

Fall URM enrollment as a percent of total fall enrollment will be equal to the % of URM population in the Cincinnati MSA, age 15-64, by fall 2021 (+0.6% each year)*

14.28%

656/4,594

13.14%

602/4,583

13.6%

605/4,450

13.8%

14.0%

14.2%

14.4%

14.60%

 

Fall African American enrollment as a percent of total fall enrollment will be equal to the % of African American population in the Cincinnati MSA, by fall 2021 (+0.96% each year)*

8.77%

403/4,594

7.86%

360/4,583

7.42%

330/4,450

8.00%

8.70%

9.30%

9.90%

10.50%

 

Fall Hispanic enrollment as a percent of total fall enrollment will be equal to the % of Hispanic population in the Cincinnati MSA, by fall 2021 (maintain 2.6%)

2.98%

137/4,594

2.60%

119/4,583

3.51%

156/4,450

3.50%

3.60%

3.60%

3.70%

3.70%

 

Fall URM enrollment from 5-county service area will meet or exceed 175% of URM population % age 15-64 in the 5-county service area (+0.15% each year)*

12.26%

489/3,988

11.88%

480/4,040

12.20%

483/3,958

12.35%

12.50%

12.65%

12.80%

12.93%

 

Fall African American enrollment from 5-county service area will meet or exceed 200% of the African American population % age 15-64 in the 5-county service area (+0.27% each year)*

6.49%

259/3.988

6.34%

256/4,040

5.71%

226/3,958

5.98%

6.25%

6.52%

6.79%

7.04%

 

Fall Hispanic enrollment from 5-county service area will meet or exceed 175% of Hispanic population % age 15-64 in the 5-county service area (+0.13%)*

3.26%

126/3,988

2.67%

108/4,040

3.74%

148/3,958

3.87%

4.00%

4.13%

4.26%

4.39%

^For both baseline years (2014-2015 and 2015-2016) as well as targets for 2016-2017, Gateway has had no enrollments from the 5 targeted Cincinnati high schools 

ACTION PLANNING

Action planning details the strategies that will contribute to the achievement of the strategic objectives, the tactics that will contribute to the success of the strategies, the measures that determine the effectiveness of the tactics, as well as the lead/accountable individual, internal/external collaborators, and the timeline for implementation.

Tactics

Measures

Lead/Accountability

Internal Collaborators

External Collaborators

Timeline

STRATEGY O1:  Develop and implement strategic marketing and recruitment activities focused on the 5 targeted Kentucky high schools

Tactic O1.1: Collaborate on the Strategic Enrollment Management (SEM) recruitment events/onsite activities at each high school during the academic year to ensure inclusion of URM populations

§   # of events/activities at each high school

§   # of follow-up contacts

§   # of students enrolling at Gateway from each targeted school, within 1 year of high school graduation (total and URM students)

Recruiter

Enrollment Counselors; Program Coordinators; Director of Early College Initiatives; Diversity and Inclusion Team

School counselors from targeted Kentucky high schools

Ongoing recruitment with engagement of intentional targeted beginning in fall 2017

Tactic O1.2: Collaborate with the targeted high schools to do on-site enrollment events

§   # of events at each school

§   # of students applying for admissions, by school

§   # of students enrolling during on-site events, by school

§   # of URM students applying for admissions, by school

§   # of URM students enrolling during on-site events, by school

Dean of Enrollment Management

Professional Advisors; Director of Financial Aid; Director of Communications

School counselors from targeted Kentucky high schools

Every spring, beginning spring 2018

Tactic O1.3: Develop and award a minimum of one freshman scholarship per targeted high school per year

§   # of scholarships developed

§   Total amount of funds allocated

§   # of scholarships awarded, by school

Coordinator of Financial Aid/Scholarships

Dean of Enrollment Management; VP Student Development; VP of Development; Director of Fiscal Services; Senior Administrative Assistant to Development

School counselors from targeted Kentucky high schools; Gateway Foundation

Beginning with 2018-2019 academic year (awards for 2019 graduates)

STRATEGY O2:  Develop and implement strategic marketing and recruitment activities focused on the 5 targeted Cincinnati, Ohio high schools

Tactic O2.1: Build strategic relationships with Cincinnati Youth Collaborative (CYC), GRAD Cincinnati, and Cincinnati public schools through meetings with school personnel, memberships on committees, and attendance at events

§   # of meetings with key staff (counselors, administrators)

§   # of Committee memberships

§   # of Gateway attendees at each event

Enrollment Counselor for Urban Metro Campus

VP Academic Affairs

VP Student Development

Diversity and Inclusion Team; Dean of Enrollment Management

School counselors from Cincinnati public schools,, Cincinnati Youth Collaborative (CYC), & GRAD Cincinnati

Ongoing

Tactic O2.2: Develop marketing and recruitment materials that strategically target Cincinnati public schools

§   # of marketing and recruitment materials developed

§   Reach of marketing materials

Director of Communications

Enrollment Counselor for Urban Metro Campus;

Recruiter

NA

Fall 2018 – marketing and recruitment materials prepared and ready for use in recruitment campaign

Tactic O2.3: Develop a strategic recruitment campaign that focuses on each targeted high school throughout the academic year

§   # of high school graduates applying to Gateway

Enrollment Counselor for Urban Metro Campus

Director of Communications

Recruiter

School counselors from Cincinnati public schools,, Cincinnati Youth Collaborative (CYC), & GRAD Cincinnati

Fall 2018 – recruitment campaign for targeted Cincinnati schools to begin

Tactic O2.4: Provide official and unofficial campus and/or program tours for students, families, and counselors within Cincinnati  public schools

§   # of tours and/or events held on Gateway campuses for Cincinnati students

Enrollment Counselor for Urban Metro Campus

Program Coordinators

Recruiter

Enrollment Counselors

Director of Early College Initiatives

School counselors from Cincinnati public schools,, Cincinnati Youth Collaborative (CYC), & GRAD Cincinnati

Tours/events beginning Spring 2018

Tactic O2.5: Streamline admissions processes for students in Cincinnati public schools

§   # of students who apply

§   # of students who enroll from these high schools

§   # of students who matriculate

Enrollment Counselor for Urban Metro Campus

Dean of Enrollment Management

School counselors from Cincinnati public schools,, Cincinnati Youth Collaborative (CYC), & GRAD Cincinnati

Spring 2018 – streamlined enrollment process ready for use with targeted Cincinnati schools

 

STRATEGY O3: Further develop Super Someday recruitment event to expand reach and recruitment efforts to more students in targeted school districts

Tactic O3.1: Develop comprehensive academic enrichment opportunities, personal development opportunities, and family engagement for the annual event

§   # of schools attending

§   # of students attending, by grade

§   # of students enrolling at Gateway through contact related to Super Someday event

Director of Diversity and Inclusion

Diversity and Inclusion Team; College-wide support

KCTCS System Office and Diversity and Inclusion Peer Team

Targeted Kentucky High Schools and Middle Schools

Targeted Cincinnati High Schools and Middle Schools

Regional Faith-Based Partners

2016-2018 – 11th and 12th

2018-2020 – 9th – 12th

2020-2022 – 6th – 12th

STRATEGY O4: Evaluate expanding dual credit program with Holmes High School to provide entry-level job training with completion of short-term credential by high school graduation

Tactic O4.1: Explore possible program areas for expansion and build action plan to pilot the expansion

 

§   # of programs offered

§   # of students enrolled

§   # of credentials awarded

Director of Early College Initiatives

Diversity and Inclusion Team; Director of Diversity and Inclusion; Respective faculty, as identified

Holmes High School

Evaluate possible program areas for expansion during 2017-2018 with pilot expansion in 2018-2019

STRATEGY O5: Develop and implement partnership program with Dohn Community High School in Cincinnati where DCHS students would earn dual credit at Gateway while fulfilling their vocational requirement for high school completion

Tactic O5.1: Work with leadership and other school personnel at Dohn Community High School to develop all aspects of the program needed to initiate a pilot.

§   Interest level of students before and after pilot implemented

§   # of students enrolled in pilot program

§   Retention rate of students in pilot

§   GPA of students in pilot

Enrollment Counselor for Urban Metro Campus

Dean of Enrollment Management; Registrar/Student Records; Director of Early College Initiatives; Director of Diversity and Inclusion; Diversity and Inclusion Team

Dohn Community High School

Development of pilot program details to occur in spring 2017

Pilot to begin during 2017-2018 academic year

STRATEGY O6: Develop partnership with Cincinnati Youth Collaborative (CYC) to provide scholarship support and seamless support services to CYC graduates who enroll at Gateway

Tactic O6.1: Develop scholarship program to help off-set costs to CYC graduates and provides further incentive for pursuing postsecondary education

§   # of scholarships offered

§   # of scholarships awarded

§   Total amount of scholarship funds awarded to CYC grads

§   # of CYC grads enrolled at Gateway immediately following high school graduation

Enrollment Management 

Diversity and Inclusion Team

Director of Financial Aid

Dean of Enrollment Management

Director of Early College Initiatives

VP of Business & Administrative Affairs; VP Student Development; VP Development; Coordinator of Financial Aid & Scholarships

Cincinnati Youth Collaborative (CYC)

Development of scholarship program in 2018 with first awards for 2018-2019 academic year

Tactic O6.2: Develop formalized CYC student engagement process to facilitate a seamless transition to Gateway

§   # of CYC applicants

§   # of CYC graduates enrolled at Gateway

§   Retention of CYC graduates who enroll at Gateway

§   # of CYC graduates who graduate from Gateway

 

Enrollment Management 

Diversity and Inclusion Team

Coordinator of Advising

AVP Student Development; VP Student Development

Cincinnati Youth Collaborative (CYC)

Process developed in spring/summer 2018 with implementation in 2018-2019 academic year

STRATEGY O7: Position Gateway as an inclusive, welcoming, and respectful educational experience for LGBTQ populations through improved campus culture, as evidenced by college participation in the Campus Pride Index*

Tactic O7.1: Use the Campus Pride LGBTQ-friendly self-assessment tool to identify gaps to inclusion, develop/implement an action plan, and participate in the Campus Pride Index

 

§   Campus Pride star ratings for individual categories

§   Campus Pride overall star rating

Staff Advisor for Gay-Straight Alliance of Gateway (GSAG)

 

Director of Diversity and Inclusion

Diversity and Inclusion Team; GSAG student organization; Student Development

 

Campus Pride (resources available on website); NKU LGBTQ Resource Office, which has received a high rating on the Pride Index

Fall 2017 – Assess current level of inclusivity and identify gaps (by December 2017)

Spring 2018 – Prioritize and develop targeted initiatives to eliminate gaps (by May 2018)

Fall 2019 – Implementation of selected initiatives

January 2020 – fill out Pride Index Survey to determine star-level rating and become listed on Campus Pride website

STRATEGY O8: Evaluate potential for development of pathways for the enrollment of international students, ESL students, and refugee populations

Tactic O8.1: Comprehensively evaluate existing refugee populations in Northern Kentucky/Greater Cincinnati, including an understanding of how Gateway might serve these populations

§   Evaluation complete

§   Determination of if/how Gateway can serve this population

Director of Diversity and Inclusion

Diversity and Inclusion Team

Adult Education Partners; ESL Staff; Academic Deans

Catholic Charities

Kentucky Refugee Ministries;  Supporting Latino Families (SLF)

Conduct evaluation during 2017-2018 academic year

Tactic O8.2: Comprehensively evaluate process required for the enrollment of international students, determination of process, including an understanding of the F-1 visa process with USCIS

§   Evaluation complete

§   Determination of if/how Gateway can serve this population

Director of Diversity and Inclusion

Diversity and Inclusion Team

Adult Education Partners; Enrollment Counselor

Catholic Charities

Kentucky Refugee Ministries; Supporting Latino Families (SLF)

Conduct evaluation during 2017-2018 academic year

Tactic O8.3: Evaluate need for an international student center/community center to assist prospective students/members of the community with navigating processes and connecting with needed services

§   Evaluation complete

§   Determination of if/how Gateway can lead the development of this center

Director of Diversity and Inclusion

Diversity and Inclusion Team

Adult Education Partners and ESL Staff

Catholic Charities

Kentucky Refugee Ministries

Hispanic Chamber of Commerce; Supporting Latino Families (SLF)

Conduct evaluation during 2017-2018 academic year

Tactic O8.4: Work with regional high schools that have large ESL student populations to determine potential support systems/pathways for entering college

§   Evaluation complete

§   Determination of next steps for pathway development

Director of Diversity and Inclusion

Diversity and Inclusion Team

Adult Education Partners and ESL Staff; Recruiter

School counselors of targeted high schools; Catholic Charities; Supporting Latino Families (SLF)

Conduct evaluation during 2017-2018 academic year

Tactic O8.5: Evaluate opportunity to introduce credit-bearing ESL courses to high schools with large ESL populations as a way to bridge the transition from high school to college

§   Research findings

Director of Diversity and Inclusion w/Diversity and Inclusion Team

Dean of Enrollment Management, Adult Education and ESL Staff

Northern Kentucky University; University of Cincinnati; Supporting Latino Families (SLF)

Conduct research during 2017-2018 academic year and develop action plan, if warranted

Tactic O8.6: Research opportunities to partner with regional universities within the Cincinnati MSA, as well as colleges/universities abroad, to identify opportunities to recruit international students to the college

§   Determine viability

§   # of schools partnering

§   # of students participating

§   # of students transitioning to Gateway after high school graduation

Director of Diversity and Inclusion

Diversity and Inclusion Team; Adult Education and ESL Staff; Academic Deans; Dean of Enrollment Management

Targeted high schools with large ESL enrollments

Evaluate opportunity in fall 2017 and if viable, develop pilot courses to begin in fall 2018

 

SUCCESS

GATEWAY STRATEGIC PLAN 2016-2022

STRATEGIC GOAL #3

Cultivate an experiential, collaborative and supportive learning environment that pursues diversity, thrives on innovation, and contribute to a connected community

STRATEGIC PRIORITIES:

3.1   Increase student engagement through authentic and motivating, formal and informal learning experiences that create vibrant and connected campus communities

3.2   Build and strengthen institutional connections with regional community agencies and services that can partner with the college to support students

3.3   Develop campuses as hubs for community engagement with increased outreach and public service of faculty and staff

3.4   Build social and learning environments that seek out and celebrate diversity and inclusion

3.5   Expand experiential learning opportunities across the curriculum

STRATEGIC GOAL #4

Develop comprehensive customizable and fluid educational pathways that are relevant and responsive to the dynamic needs of the region

STRATEGIC PRIORITIES:

4.1   Enhance program offerings to ensure a diverse portfolio of credentials that provide multiple entry and exit points aligned with opportunities for employment and/or continued education

4.2   Ensure programming produces career-ready graduates that meet workforce needs in both technical and soft skills

4.3   Increase direct involvement of local employers to ensure relevancy and responsiveness to regional needs

STRATEGIC OBJECTIVES

The strategic objectives and performance measures related to underrepresented minority and low-income populations are disaggregations of objectives and measures within the college’s Strategic Enrollment Management Plan. Strategic objectives are organized by Key Performance Indicator, each of which represents a point along the student pathway.

Key Performance Indicators

Strategic Objectives

Performance Measures

Baseline Performance

Target

Method of Assessment

Frequency of Assessment

Retention

Close the gap in within semester retention between URM and NON-URM students by 2022 (+0.65% for URM and 0.28% for NON-URM)

Within Semester URM Retention: Percentage of first-time, credential-seeking URM students enrolled in fall that remain enrolled with the college through the end of the semesters

Fall 2015

80.56% (URM)

87.18% (NON)

 

Fall 2021

93.02% (URM)

93.01% (NON)

DSS/PeopleSoft Student Information System

Evaluated each year

§   February 1 (fall)

Close the gap in 1st year fall-to-spring retention between URM and NON-URM students by 2022

1st Year Fall-to-Spring Retention: First-year, fall-to-spring retention rates of first-time, credential-seeking students

Fall 2015

52.73% (URM)

69.91% (NON

Fall 2021

75.53% (URM)

75.61% (NON)

DSS/PeopleSoft Student Information System

Evaluated each year

§   February 1 (fall)

Close the gap in 1st to 2nd year retention between URM and NON-URM students by 2022 (annual increase of 1.65% for URM and 1.0% for NON-URM)

1st to 2nd Year Retention of URM Students: Fall-to-fall retention rates of first-time, credential-seeking URM students as reported to IPEDS

2015-2016

43.1% (URM)

50.20% (NON)

2021-2022

54.9% (URM)

56.20% (NON)

DSS/PeopleSoft Student Information System

Evaluated each year

§   February 1

Close the gap in 1st to 2nd year retention between low-income, URM and NON-URM students by 2022 (annual increase of 0.70% per year)

1st to 2nd Year Retention of Low-Income Students: Fall-to-fall retention rates of first-time, credential-seeking low-income students as reported to IPEDS

2015-2016

54.10%

2021-2022

57.40%

DSS/PeopleSoft Student Information System

Evaluated each year

§   February 1

Student Engagement

Maintain CCSSE average benchmark scores at or above the national average

Student Engagement: Average scores on the Community College Survey of Student Engagement (CCSSE)

2015

2021

Results of CCSSE

CCSSE Administered Every-Other Year in Odd-Numbered Years: Spring 2015, 2017, 2019, 2021

§   Academic Challenge

46.9

50.0

§   Active Learning

46.6

50.0

§   Student Effort

47.1

50.0

§   Student-Faculty Interaction

54.1

50.0

§   Support for Learners

52.3

50.0

Credentials Awarded

The # of credentials awarded to URM students will increase each year

Associate Degrees Awarded: Number of associate degrees awarded to URM students during an academic year (July 1 – June 30)

2015-2016

12.70% of total

56/441

(Enroll 13.14%)

2021-2022

250 (degrees, certificates, and diplomas)

DSS/PeopleSoft Student Information System

Evaluated each year:

§   October 15

The % of associate degrees to African American students will be equal to or greater than the % of African American enrollment in the fall of the given year

Associate Degrees Awarded: Number of associate degrees awarded to African American students during an academic year (July 1 – June 30)

2015-2016

7.48% of total

33/441

(Enroll 7.86%)

2021-2022

10.50%*

DSS/PeopleSoft Student Information System

Evaluated each year:

§   October 15

The % of associate degrees to Hispanic students will be equal to or greater than the % of Hispanic enrollment in the fall of the given year

Associate Degrees Awarded: Number of associate degrees awarded to Hispanic students during an academic year (July 1 – June 30)

2015-2016

2.72% of total

12/441

(Enroll 2.60%)

2021-2022

3.70%*

DSS/PeopleSoft Student Information System

Evaluated each year:

§   October 15

The # of credentials awarded to low-income students will increase each year

Associate Degrees Awarded: Number of associate degrees awarded to low-income students during an academic year (July 1 – June 30)

2015-2016

61.2% of total

270/441

(Enroll 45.1%)

2021-2022

1,023 (degrees, certificates, and diplomas)

DSS/PeopleSoft Student Information System

Evaluated each year:

§   October 15

The # of credentials awarded to URM students will increase each year

Certificates and Diplomas Awarded: Combined number of certificates and diplomas awarded to underrepresented minority students during an academic year (July 1 – June 30)

2015-2016

11.12% of total

167/1,502

(Enroll 13.14%)

2021-2022

250 (degrees, certificates, and diplomas)

DSS/PeopleSoft Student Information System

Evaluated each year:

§   October 15

The % of certificates and diplomas awarded to African American students will be equal to or greater than the % of African American enrollment in the fall of the given year

Certificates and Diplomas Awarded: Combined number of certificates and diplomas awarded to African American students during an academic year (July 1 – June 30)

2015-2016

5.79% of total

87/1,502

(Enroll 7.86%)

2021-2022

10.50%*

DSS/PeopleSoft Student Information System

Evaluated each year:

§   October 15

The % of certificates and diplomas awarded to Hispanic students will be equal to or greater than the % of Hispanic enrollment in the fall of the given year

Certificates and Diplomas Awarded: Combined number of certificates and diplomas awarded to Hispanic students during an academic year (July 1 – June 30)

2015-2016

2.00% of total

30/1,502

(Enroll 2.60%)

2021-2022

3.70%*

DSS/PeopleSoft Student Information System

Evaluated each year:

§   October 15

The # of credentials awarded to low-income students will increase each year

Certificates and Diplomas Awarded: Combined number of certificates and diplomas awarded to low-income students during an academic year (July 1 – June 30)

2015-2016

47.5% of total

714/1,502

(Enroll 45.1%)

 

2021-2022

1,023 (degrees, certificates, and diplomas)

DSS/PeopleSoft Student Information System

Evaluated each year:

§   October 15

Graduation Rate

Close the gap in graduation rate between underrepresented minority and non-underrepresented minority with a target of 35% for both populations by 2022 (increase URM graduation rate by 1.45% each year; NON by 0.87% each year)

Graduation Rate: Cohort of full-time, first-time degree/certificate-seeking underrepresented minority students who complete their program within 150% of normal time as reported to IPEDS

2015-2016

33.33% (URM)

29.81% (NON)

2021-2022

26.2% (URM)

35.03% (NON)

DSS/PeopleSoft Student Information System

Evaluated each year:

§   October 15

Close the gap in graduation rate between low-income, URM and NON-URM, with a target of 35% for all populations by 2022 (increase low-income graduation rate by 1.43% each year)

Graduation Rate: Cohort of full-time, first-time degree/certificate-seeking low-income students who complete their program within 150% of normal time as reported to IPEDS

2015-2016

26.0% (LI)

2021-2022

31.0% (LI)

DSS/PeopleSoft Student Information System

Evaluated each year:

§   October 15

 

STRATEGIC OBJECTIVES: ANNUAL TARGETS

The strategic objectives provided above are shown here with annual/incremental targets.

Strategic Objectives

2014-2015

BASELINE

2015-2016

BASELINE

2016-2017

TARGET

2017-2018

TARGET

2018-2019

TARGET

2019-2020

TARGET

2020-2021

TARGET

2021-2022

TARGET

KPI: RETENTION

Close the gap in within semester retention between URM and NON-URM students by 2022 (annually +0.65% for URM and 0.28% for NON-URM)

88.89% (URM)

89.86% (NON)

80.56% (URM)

87.18% (NON)

89.77% (URM)

91.61% (NON)

90.42% (URM)

91.89% (NON)

 

91.07% (URM)

92.17% (NON)

91.72% (URM)

92.45% (NON)

92.37% (URM)

92.73% (NON)

93.02% (URM)

93.01% (NON)

Close the gap in 1st year fall-to-spring retention between URM and NON-URM students by 2022 (+

66.23% (URM)

75.41% (NON)

52.73% (URM)

69.61% (NON)

56.53% (URM)

70.61% (NON)

60.33% (URM)

71.61% (NON)

64.13% (RUM)

72.61% (NON)

67.93% (URM)

73.61% (NON)

71.73% (URM)

74.61% (NON)

75.53% (URM)

75.61% (NON)

Close the gap in 1st to 2nd year retention between URM and NON-URM students by 2022 (annually +1.65% for URM and 1.0% for NON-URM)

48.80% (URM)

49.20% (NON)

48.90% (URM)

50.20% (NON)

43.10% (URM)

51.20% (NON)

50.90% (URM)

52.20% (NON)

51.90% (URM)

53.20% (NON)

52.90% (URM)

54.20% (NON)

53.90% (URM)

55.20% (NON)

54.90% (URM)

56.20% (NON)

Close the gap in 1st to 2nd year retention between low-income students, URM and NON-URM students by 2022 (annual increase of 0.70% per year)

51.40%

54.10%

52.40%

53.40%

54.40%

55.40%

56.40%

57.40%

KPI: STUDENT ENGAGEMENT

Maintain CCSSE average benchmark scores at or above the national average

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

§   Academic Challenge

46.9

 

50.0

 

50.0

 

50.0

 

§   Active Learning

46.6

 

50.0

 

50.0

 

50.0

 

§   Student Effort

47.1

 

50.0

 

50.0

 

50.0

 

§   Student-Faculty Interaction

54.1

 

50.0

 

50.0

 

50.0

 

§   Support for Learners

52.3

 

50.0

 

50.0

 

50.0

 

KPI: CREDENTIALS AWARDED

The # of credentials awarded to URM students will increase each year

13.24%

56/423

(Enroll 14.28%

12.70%

56/441

(Enroll 13.14%)

219 (degrees, certificates, and diplomas)

225 (degrees, certificates, and diplomas)

231 (degrees, certificates, and diplomas)

237 (degrees, certificates, and diplomas)

244 (degrees, certificates, and diplomas)

250 (degrees, certificates, and diplomas)

The % of associate degrees to African American students will be equal to or greater than the % of African American enrollment in the fall of the given year

6.86%

29/423

(Enroll 8.77%)

7.48%

33.441

(Enroll 7.86%)

7.4%

8.00%

8.70%

9.30%

9.90%

10.50%

 

The % of associate degrees to Hispanic students will be equal to or greater than the % of Hispanic enrollment in the fall of the given year

3.07%

13/423

(Enroll 2.98%)

2.72%

12/441

(Enroll 2.60%)

3.5%

3.50%

3.60%

3.60%

3.70%

3.70%

 

The # of credentials awarded to low-income students will increase each year

69.3%

293/423

 

2015-2016

61.2% of total

270/441

(Enroll 45.1%)

964 (degrees, certificates, and diplomas)

976 (degrees, certificates, and diplomas)

988 (degrees, certificates, and diplomas)

999 (degrees, certificates, and diplomas)

1,011 (degrees, certificates, and diplomas)

1,023 (degrees, certificates, and diplomas)

The # of credentials awarded to URM students will increase each year

14.10%

178/1,262

(Enroll 14.28%)

11.12%

167/1,502

(Enroll 13.14%)

219 (degrees, certificates, and diplomas)

225 (degrees, certificates, and diplomas)

231 (degrees, certificates, and diplomas)

237 (degrees, certificates, and diplomas)

244 (degrees, certificates, and diplomas)

250 (degrees, certificates, and diplomas)

The % of certificates and diplomas awarded to African American students will be equal to or greater than the % of African American enrollment in the fall of the given year

7.21%

91/1,262

(Enroll 8.77%)

5.79%

87/1,502

(Enroll 7.86%

7.4%

8.00%

8.70%

9.30%

9.90%

10.50%

 

The % of certificates and diplomas awarded to Hispanic students will be equal to or greater than the % of Hispanic enrollment in the fall of the given year

4.04%

51/1,262

(Enroll 2.98%)

2.00%

30/1,502

(Enroll 2.60%)

3.5%

3.50%

3.60%

3.60%

3.70%

3.70%

 

The # of credentials awarded to low-income students will increase each year

51.66%

652/1,262

 

2015-2016

47.5% of total

714/1,502

(Enroll 45.1%)

 

 

964 (degrees, certificates, and diplomas)

976 (degrees, certificates, and diplomas)

988 (degrees, certificates, and diplomas)

999 (degrees, certificates, and diplomas)

1,011 (degrees, certificates, and diplomas)

1,023 (degrees, certificates, and diplomas)

KPI: GRADUATION RATE

Close the gap between URM and NON-URM with target of 35% for both populations by 2022 (increase URM graduation rate by 1.00% per year; NON by 0.87% per year)

20.7% (URM)

35.00% (NON)

33.33% (URM)

29.81% (NON)

22.20% (URM)

30.68% (NON)

23.20% (URM)

31.55% (NON)

24.20% (URM)

32.42% (NON)

25.20% (URM)

33.29% (NON)

26.20% (URM)

34.16% (NON)

27.20% (URM)

35.03% (NON)

Close the gap between low-income, URM and NON-URM with target of 35% for all three populations by 2022 (increase low-income graduation rate by 1.43% per year)

25.0%

26.0%

26.00%

27.00%

28.00%

29.00%

30.00%

31.00%

 

ACTION PLANNING

Action planning details the strategies that will contribute to the achievement of the strategic objectives, the tactics that will contribute to the success of the strategies, the measures that determine the effectiveness of the tactics, as well as the lead/accountable individual, internal/external collaborators, and the timeline for implementation.

Tactics

Measures

Lead/Accountability

Internal Collaborators

External Collaborators

Timeline

STRATEGY S1: Increase engagement/participation in student organizations/groups

Tactic S1.1: Explore the need and feasibility of a common hour/meeting time when all student organizations and groups could meet

§   # of active student organizations

§   # of members by organization

§   # of common hour attendees

§   # participating organizations

§   # of participants

§   # of activities held during common hour

Coordinator of Student Engagement

Faculty and Staff Advisors of Student Organizations; Academic Affairs

Will be determined, as needed

Initiate exploration in Fall 2017, If feasible, targeted implementation in 2018-2019 academic year.

Tactic S1.2: Investigate need for additional student groups and organizations that are more specific to culture, i.e. African American Student Union, etc.

§   # of student groups or organizations identified and developed

§   Rationale for development of each org

§   # of members by org

Director of Diversity and Inclusion

Diversity and Inclusion Team; Coordinator of Student Engagement

Will be determined, as needed

Ongoing

Tactic S1.3: Re-establish the Gay-Straight Alliance of Gateway (GSAG), recruit students to join (through word of mouth, marketing, social media) and create and implement LGBTQ-friendly activities

§   # of GSAG activities held

§   # of student participants at GSAG activities

§   # of employee participants at GSAG activities

§   # of community members at GSAG activities

Staff Advisor for Gay-Straight Alliance of Gateway

Coordinator of Student Engagement; Web/Social Media Manager

NKU LGBTQ programs and services; Cincy PRIDE, GLSEN; NKY Fairness

§   2017-2018 hold one event per semester

§   2018 and beyond – hold two activities/events per semester

Tactic S1.4: Partner with Adult Education/ESL for multicultural events that bridge Adult Education and postsecondary education relationships

§   # of events held

§   # of participants

Director of Diversity and Inclusion

Diversity and Inclusion Team

Adult Education and ESL Staff

Will be determined, as needed

§   Begin partnering in 2017-2018 academic year

STRATEGY S2: Develop comprehensive arts and culture programming including exhibits, activities, and events to invite and engage diverse populations on campus

Tactic S2.1: Increase use of Gallery space within the Center for Technology, Innovation, and Enterprise (TIE) for art and cultural events, tied to calendar of key initiatives

§   # of events held in the gallery each year

§   # of exhibits held in the gallery each year

Assistant Professor of Visual Communications (Gallery Coordinator)

Diversity and Inclusion Team; Coordinator of Student Engagement; VP Development; Dean of Enrollment Management; Human Services Department

Kenton County Public Library; Various, to be engaged as needed

2017-2018 – hold a minimum of 12 exhibits/events per academic year in the gallery

Tactic S2.2: Develop partnerships with regional arts and culture organizations to provide more opportunities to engage students and employees in the arts

§   # of partnerships developed

§   # of activities

§   # of participants

Assistant Professor of Visual Communications (Gallery Coordinator)

Diversity and Inclusion Team; Center for Professional Excellence; Coordinator of Student Engagement; VP Development; Dean of Enrollment Management

The Carnegie; Baker Hunt Cultural Center; NKY Fairness; Freedom Center; Kenton County Public Library; Others, as needed/identified

Ongoing

Tactic S2.3: Identify key regional celebrations related to different cultures and build on those activities by expanding the energy onto campus (i.e. Cincy-Cinco)

§   # of celebrations identified

§   # of activities held

Director of Diversity and Inclusion

Diversity and Inclusion Team; Coordinator of Student Engagement; VP Development; Director of Communications

Hispanic Chamber of Commerce; African American Chamber of Commerce; NKY Fairness; Freedom Center; Kenton County Public Library; others as identified

Create initial calendar of events in summer 2017 to begin engaging in 2017-2018

Tactic S2.4: Gateway faculty and staff to volunteer at/attend regional cultural events to build relationships and promote the image of the college as an inclusive environment

§   # of events college participates in

§   # of faculty/staff who volunteer at events

Director of Diversity and Inclusion

Diversity and Inclusion Team

Various, identified as needed

Identify/develop volunteer/attendee process during 2017-2018 academic year.

Implement volunteer/attendee process 2018-2019

STRATEGY S3: Develop a comprehensive and collaborative case management model between Gateway and both NKY Scholar Houses: Northern Kentucky Scholar House and Lincoln Grant Scholar House to support at-risk, low-income parents in their pursuit of postsecondary education

Tactic S3.1: Develop a formal, concrete, collaborative process (i.e. regularly scheduled meetings, case management plans, etc.) for scholar house resident enrollment and support

§   # of Lincoln Grant Scholar House residents enrolled

§   # of Newport Scholar House residents enrolled

§   GPA of Scholar House residents enrolled at Gateway

§   Retention (within, sem-to-sem, and year to year) of Scholar House residents enrolled at Gateway as compared to the college

§   # of credentials awarded

Community Resource Success Coach

Dean of Enrollment Management; Ready-to-Work Coordinators; Support Services, as needed

Northern Kentucky Community Action Commission, Lincoln Grant Scholar House; Brighton Center; Northern Kentucky Scholar House

Initial process model developed by summer 2017 for use in 2017-2018 academic year

Tactic S3.2: Develop a formal MOU with each scholar house to ensure sharing of data on residents/Gateway students

§   MOUs created

Community Resource Success Coach

Director of Knowledge Management; Dean of Enrollment Management; Registrar/Student Records

Northern Kentucky Community Action Commission, Lincoln Grant Scholar House; Brighton Center; Northern Kentucky Scholar House

MOU developed, signed and in place by summer 2017

Tactic S3.3: Develop program to assist in the reduction of financial barriers for incoming scholar house residents who plan to enroll at Gateway.

§   # of students assisted each year

§   Amount of financial support provided

Community Resource Success Coach

VP Development; Coordinator of Financial Aid and Scholarships; Director of Financial Aid; Development Admin Assistant; Business Office staff

Gateway Foundation

Scholarship program developed by end of summer 2018 to be accessible for new Scholar House resident students for 2018-2019 academic year

STRATEGY S4: Develop and/or expand of non-academic support services to serve low-income population

Tactic S4.1: Evaluate the need for expanding the on-campus clothing closet and food pantry to support students (specifically low-income).

§   Input gathered from internal/external stakeholders on expansion needs

Community Resource Success Coach

Human Services Faculty and Students; Ready-to-Work Coordinators

Various, as needed

Evaluation of expansion needs by end of fall 2017

Tactic S4.2: Evaluate the need for a location on each campus where students can get support from peer mentors and/or staff to apply onsite for public benefits (low-income population)

§   # of students served

§   # of new on-campus spaces set up to provide public benefits support

Community Resource Success Coach

VP Student Development; VP Business and Administrative Services; Ready-to-Work Coordinators

Various, as needed

Evaluation and identification of space during 2017-2018 academic year with implementation by fall 2018

STRATEGY S5: Evaluate and expand of curriculum that emphasizes inclusion and appreciation of diversity and culture

Tactic S5.1: Conduct a curriculum review of each division to identify ways to incorporate and/or verify an emphasis on diversity and inclusion and make necessary revisions

§   # of curriculum reviews conducted

§   Which areas/programs implemented revisions

§   # of curricula revised to incorporate greater emphasis on inclusion

Director of Diversity and Inclusion

Academic Affairs; Human Services Department; Academic Deans; Program Coordinators; Diversity and Inclusion Team; Knowledge Management

Kenton County Public Library; External curriculum reviewer

Identify curriculum reviewer in fall 2018, conduct curriculum review 2018-2019, Begin revisions 2019-2020

 

IMPACT

GATEWAY STRATEGIC PLAN 2016-2022

STRATEGIC GOAL #5

Strengthen long-term institutional growth and stability

STRATEGIC PRIORITIES:

5.1   Increase the efficient and effective use of existing fiscal, physical and human resources

5.2   Aggressively pursue new, unique sources of external funding to build a strong financial base for the college

5.3   Promote a culture of openness, dialogue and effective communication at all levels

5.4   Focus on recruitment, retention and compensation of highly qualified, well-trained employees who are a good fit within the culture of the institution

5.5   Develop a strong professional development program focused on excellence and innovation in teaching and learning 

STRATEGIC OBJECTIVES

The strategic objectives and performance measures related to underrepresented minority and low-income populations are disaggregations of objectives and measures within the college’s Strategic Enrollment Management Plan. Strategic objectives are organized by Key Performance Indicator, each of which represents a point along the student pathway.

Key Performance Indicators

Strategic Objectives

Performance Measures

Baseline Performance

Target

Method of Assessment

Frequency of Assessment

WORKFORCE DIVERSITY

The percent of URM faculty will be equal to the % of URM student enrollment by 2022

Workforce Diversity – Faculty**: URM faculty (having faculty status) as a percentage of all faculty

7.5%

8.80%

Data submitted to Council on Postsecondary Education & IPEDS

Evaluated each year:

§   June 15

The percent of URM management occupations (executive and professional staff) will remain equal to or greater than the % of URM student enrollment through 2022

 

Workforce Diversity – Executive Staff: URM Executive Staff as a percentage of all executive staff. Executive staff shall include the president, provost, all vice presidents, deans, and academic chairs

14.3%

 

22.4%

Data submitted to Council on Postsecondary Education & IPEDS

 

Evaluated each year:

§   June 15

**The CPE performance measure for “Workforce Diversity-Faculty” is not applicable to Gateway Community & Technical College as the college does not have tenured faculty.

STRATEGIC OBJECTIVES: ANNUAL TARGETS

The strategic objectives provided above are shown here with annual/incremental targets.

 

Strategic Objectives

2014-2015

BASELINE

2015-2016

BASELINE

2016-2017

TARGET

2017-2018

TARGET

2018-2019

TARGET

2019-2020

TARGET

2020-2021

TARGET

2021-2022

TARGET

KPI: WORKFORCE DIVERSITY

The percent of URM faculty will be equal to the % of URM student enrollment by 2022

7.1%

 

7.50%

 

6.99%

7.60%

7.80%

8.10%

8.40%

8.80%

The percent of URM management occupations (executive and professional staff) will remain equal to or greater than the % of URM student enrollment through 2022

8.6%

 

 

14.3%

 

 

17.9%

 

16.8%

 

18.2%

 

19.6%

 

21.0%

 

22.4%

 

 

ACTION PLANNING

Action planning details the strategies that will contribute to the achievement of the strategic objectives, the tactics that will contribute to the success of the strategies, the measures that determine the effectiveness of the tactics, as well as the lead/accountable individual, internal/external collaborators, and the timeline for implementation.

Tactics

Measures

Lead/Accountability

Internal Collaborators

External Collaborators

Timeline

STRATEGY I1: Promote a supportive campus environment for LGBTQ students and employees

Tactic I1.1: Develop and implement a Safe Zone program for Gateway employees

§   # of employees trained

§   # of employees who self-identify as an ally after training (based on post-training survey)

Staff Advisor to Gay-Straight Alliance of Gateway (GSAG)

Gateway’s Project Care Team; Gateway Center for Professional Excellence

NACADA (the Global Community for Advising) colleagues with experience implementing similar programs on their own campuses

Summer 2017 – Develop training; develop recognition process/program

Fall 2017 – Pilot training to small group of employees; begin recognition program with first employees to complete training

Spring 2018 and beyond – offer training to all employees

Tactic I1.2: Develop and implement an LGBTQ educational program for Gateway students

§   # of student participants

Staff Advisor to GSAG

Gateway’s Project Care Team; Faculty in targeted programs where training would be especially beneficial; “Star students” who are popular opinion leaders (e.g. peer mentors, SGA officers, etc.)

NACADA colleagues with experience implementing similar programs on their own campuses

Summer 2018 – develop training with student input

Fall 2018 – pilot training to small group of students

Spring 2019 and beyond – offer training to all students

Tactic I1.3: Ensure there are easily identifiable all-gender restroom options at each campus.

§   # of restrooms available per campus

Staff Advisor to GSAG

VP of Business and Administrative Affairs; Director of Diversity and Inclusion; Diversity and Inclusion Team; Maintenance and Operations

N/A

Summer 2017 – assess current restroom offerings and needs

Fall 2017 – develop plan based on findings

Spring 2018 – implement plan

Tactic I1.4: Create a webpage to disseminate information about LGBTQprograms and services at Gateway

 

§   # of hits

Staff Advisor to GSAG

Web-Social Media Manager

N/A

Webpage in place by Fall 2018

STRATEGY I2: Develop infrastructure to provide sustainability of efforts around diversity, equity, and inclusion and ensure these efforts are strategically embedded into programs and services across the institution

Tactic I2.1: Identify/hire a permanent Director of Diversity and Inclusion as part of a recurring budget dedicated to supporting the work outlined within the comprehensive diversity plan

§   Director Hired

President/CEO

Director of Human Resources; Diversity and Inclusion Team; VP Administrative and Business Affairs

N/A

Director hired for 2017-2018 academic year

Tactic I2.2: Identify key personnel in student-facing areas as Diversity and Inclusion liaisons to support URM students from recruitment through graduation

·          # of liaisons

Director of Diversity and Inclusion

Diversity and Inclusion Team; Admissions; Enrollment; Advising; Student Development; Human Services

N/A

Begin identifying liaisons – 2017; Have liaisons in place 2018-2019

Tactic I2.3: Collaborate with SEM Team to ensure ongoing communication and implementation of complementary processes

§   # of representatives serving on both teams

§   # of joint meetings

§   # of collaboration efforts

Director of Diversity and Inclusion

President/CEO; VP Academic Affairs; VP Student Development; Dean of Enrollment Management; AVP Student Development

N/A

Prior to start of 2017-2018 academic year

STRATEGY I3: Develop and/or identify professional and personal development opportunities for faculty and staff focused on uncovering implicit biases and improving cultural competence

Tactic I3.1: Assess the cultural competence of faculty and staff to obtain a baseline measurement and reassess on a recurring, periodic schedule

§   # of faculty and staff who complete the assessment

Director of Diversity and Inclusion

Diversity and Inclusion Team; Director of Human Resources; Director of Knowledge Management

N/A

Conduct initial assessment during spring 2018; Reassess cultural competence every two years: spring 2020, spring 2022

Tactic I3.2: Develop comprehensive program to utilize results of cultural competence assessment to build/improve the cultural competence of faculty and staff

§   # of strategies developed

§   # of established targets met

Director of Diversity and Inclusion

Diversity and Inclusion Team; Director of Human Resources

Kentucky Commission on Human Rights; National Underground Railroad Freedom Center; Kenton County Public Library

Develop strategies during 2018-2019; Annual evaluation of progress each year after

Tactic I3.3: Develop and deliver specialized workshops for faculty and staff that focus on uncovering individual implicit biases and learning how to use that information

§   # of workshops provided

§   # of faculty and staff who participate

Director of Diversity and Inclusion

Diversity and Inclusion Team; Director of Human Resources

National Underground Railroad Freedom Center; KY Human Rights Commission; Community and Restorative Justice Board; Hispanic Chamber of Commerce; African American Chamber of Commerce; Kenton County Public Library; others, as identified

Initial workshops to be held during 2017-2018 academic year

Tactic I3.4: Provide introductory Spanish workshops (and/or other languages identified as needed) for interested employees

 

 

§   # of workshops held

§   # of faculty and staff who participate

§   what are participants able to do after taking the class (via pre-post assessment)

Director of Diversity and Inclusion

Diversity and Inclusion Team; Director of Human Resources; VP of Workforce Solutions; Adult Education Partners and ESL Staff; AA & AS faculty; Human Services Department

Supporting Latino Families (SLF); Kenton County Public Library; To be determined, as needed

Investigate resources in spring 2018; Connect employees with workshop offerings fall 2018

 

 

 

STRATEGY I4: Develop and/or identify professional and personal development opportunities for students focused on uncovering implicit biases and improving cultural competence

Tactic I4.1 Administer a cultural competency assessment to students; incorporating into curriculum where possible

§   Method for assessing students identified

§   # of new curriculum incorporations

Director of Diversity and Inclusion

Diversity and Inclusion Team; Academic Deans; Program Coordinators; Human Services Department; Additional Faculty

NA

Determination of process by spring 2018; Implementation of assessment in 2018-2019

Tactic I4.2: Investigate the addition of a learning module into the Blackboard shells for online, hybrid, and web-enhanced courses that provides some initial self-reflection or education on implicit bias and cultural competency

 

§   Viability of adding this module/pilot of using the module

§   # of students who complete the module

Director of Diversity and Inclusion

Associate VP/Director of eLearning; Instructional Designers; Diversity and Inclusion Team; System Office

NA

Investigate capability/viability for pilot during 2017-2018 with pilot implementation (if viable) in 2018-2019

STRATEGY I5: Increase and diversify efforts to attract/recruit and retention of a more diverse mix of faculty and staff

Tactic I5.1: Expand targeted recruitment of URM faculty and staff through external channels and partnerships; secure funds needed to expand recruitment efforts

§   # of outlets used for job postings/recruitment

§   Types of outlets utilized

§   Diversity of applicant pools for targeted positions

§   # of bilingual faculty and staff hired

Director of Human Resources

Diversity and Inclusion Team; Leadership responsible for the open positions

Greater Cincinnati Urban League; Hispanic Chamber of Commerce; African American Chamber of Commerce; others as identified

Ongoing

 

QUALITATIVE ASSESSMENT OF SATISFACTION AND ENGAGEMENT

Qualitative assessment will focus on feedback from students and employees related to satisfaction and engagement. Within the assessment of engagement, detailed CCSSE data will be disaggregated by race to provide more in-depth analysis of feedback, allowing the college to target specific areas. The last CCSSE evaluation period was spring 2015 with the next evaluation period occurring in the current spring (2017) semester. Only one year of CCSSE data disaggregated by race has been reviewed, therefore specific targets have not been established at individual question level. Rather, this data will be monitored and used to direct continuous improvement of programs and services.

 

Assessment Question

Assessment Method

Baseline Performance

Target

Frequency of Assessment

Student Satisfaction Survey

Students feel welcome on campus

5 options scale with 5 (Strongly Agree) being the highest and 1 (Strongly Disagree)

Spring 2016: 4.43

Spring 2018: 4.45

Spring 2020: 4.50

Spring 2022: 4.55

Spring 2018

Spring 2020

Spring 2022

It is an enjoyable experience to be a student at this college

5 options scale with 5 (Strongly Agree) being the highest and 1 (Strongly Disagree)

Spring 2016: 4.28

Spring 2018: 4.30

Spring 2020: 4.35

Spring 2022: 4.40

Spring 2018

Spring 2020

Spring 2022

The campus staff are caring and helpful

5 options scale with 5 (Strongly Agree) being the highest and 1 (Strongly Disagree).

Spring 2016: 4.39

Spring 2018: 4.40

Spring 2020: 4.45

Spring 2022: 4.50

Spring 2018

Spring 2020

Spring 2022

The college does everything it can to help me achieve my academic goals

5 options scale with 5 (Strongly Agree) being the highest and 1 (Strongly Disagree).

Spring 2016: 4.18

Spring 2018: 4.20

Spring 2020: 4.25

Spring 2022: 4.30

Spring 2018

Spring 2020

Spring 2022

Faculty are understanding of students’ unique life circumstances

5 options scale with 5 (Strongly Agree) being the highest and 1 (Strongly Disagree).

Spring 2016: 4.14

Spring 2018: 4.15

Spring 2020: 4.20

Spring 2022: 4.25

Spring 2018

Spring 2020

Spring 2022

Faculty engage with me inside/outside the classroom

5 options scale with 5 (Strongly Agree) being the highest and 1 (Strongly Disagree).

Spring 2016: 4.26

Spring 2018: 4.30

Spring 2020: 4.35

Spring 2022: 4.40

Spring 2018

Spring 2020

Spring 2022

Faculty provide timely feedback about student progress in a course

5 options scale with 5 (Strongly Agree) being the highest and 1 (Strongly Disagree).

Spring 2016: 4.31

Spring 2018: 4.35

Spring 2020: 4.40

Spring 2022: 4.45

Spring 2018

Spring 2020

Spring 2022

Students are notified early in the semester if they are performing poorly in class

5 options scale with 5 (Strongly Agree) being the highest and 1 (Strongly Disagree).

Spring 2016: 4.15

Spring 2018: 4.20

Spring 2020: 4.25

Spring 2022: 4.30

Spring 2018

Spring 2020

Spring 2022

 

Community College Survey of Student Engagement (CCSSE) – 2015 RESULTS

ACADEMIC CHALLENGE

Question/Item

Point Scale

ALL STUDENTS

AFRICAN AMERICAN

HISPANIC

WHITE

CCSSE BENCHMARK

Timeline for Assessment

Worked harder than you thought you could to meet an instructor’s standards or expectations

Point scale (0 = Don’t Know, 1 = Never, 2 = Sometimes, 3 = Often, 4 = Very Often)

2.67

 

2.99

3.11

2.63

2.64

Spring 2017

Spring 2019

Spring 2021

Analyzing the basic elements of an idea, experience or theory

Point scale (1 = Very Little, 2 = Some, 3 = Quite a Bit, 4 = Very Much)

2.79

 

3.03

2.65

2.77

2.93

Spring 2017

Spring 2019

Spring 2021

Synthesizing and organizing ideas, information, or experiences in new ways

Point scale (1 = Very Little, 2 = Some, 3 = Quite a Bit, 4 = Very Much)

2.74

 

3.09

2.42

2.71

2.80

Spring 2017

Spring 2019

Spring 2021

Making judgments about the value or soundness of information, arguments, or methods

Point scale (1 = Very Little, 2 = Some, 3 = Quite a Bit, 4 = Very Much)

2.61

 

2.80

2.58

2.62

2.64

Spring 2017

Spring 2019

Spring 2021

Applying theories or concepts to practical problems in new situations

Point scale (1 = Very Little, 2 = Some, 3 = Quite a Bit, 4 = Very Much)

2.72

 

3.14

2.55

2.70

2.74

Spring 2017

Spring 2019

Spring 2021

Using information you have read or heard to perform a new skill

Point scale (1 = Very Little, 2 = Some, 3 = Quite a Bit, 4 = Very Much)

2.88

 

3.23

3.28

2.84

2.87

Spring 2017

Spring 2019

Spring 2021

Number of assigned textbooks/manuals/boons/book-length packs of course readings

Point scale (1 = None, 2 = 1, 3 = 2, 4 = 4-6, 5 = More than 6)

2.82

 

2.65

3.21

2.81

2.89

Spring 2017

Spring 2019

Spring 2021

Number of written papers or reports of any length

Point scale (1 = Very Little, 2 = Some, 3 = Quite a Bit, 4 = Very Much)

2.54

 

2.72

2.84

2.54

2.88

Spring 2017

Spring 2019

Spring 2021

The extent to which your examinations during the current school year have challenged you to do your best work at this college

Point scale (1 = Extremely Easy to 7 = Extremely Challenging)

4.96

 

5.28

5.40

4.90

4.96

Spring 2017

Spring 2019

Spring 2021

Encouraging you to spend significant amounts of time studying

Point scale (1 = Very Little, 2 = Some, 3 = Quite a Bit, 4 = Very Much)

2.98

 

3.25

2.87

2.97

3.05

Spring 2017

Spring 2019

Spring 2021

 

ACTIVE AND COLLABORATIVE LEARNING

Question/Item

Point Scale

ALL STUDENTS

AFRICAN AMERICAN

HISPANIC

WHITE

CCSSE BENCHMARK

Timeline for Assessment

Asked questions in class or contributed to class discussions

Point scale (0 = Don’t Know, 1 = Never, 2 = Sometimes, 3 = Often, 4 = Very Often)

3.11

 

3.26

2.97

3.09

2.92

Spring 2017

Spring 2019

Spring 2021

Made a class presentation

Point scale (0 = Don’t Know, 1 = Never, 2 = Sometimes, 3 = Often, 4 = Very Often)

2.00

 

2.29

2.24

1.96

2.16

Spring 2017

Spring 2019

Spring 2021

Worked with other students on projects during class

Point scale (0 = Don’t Know, 1 = Never, 2 = Sometimes, 3 = Often, 4 = Very Often)

2.58

 

2.45

2.55

2.58

2.55

Spring 2017

Spring 2019

Spring 2021

Worked with classmates outside of class to prepare class assignments

Point scale (0 = Don’t Know, 1 = Never, 2 = Sometimes, 3 = Often, 4 = Very Often)

1.61

 

1.64

1.65

1.62

1.95

Spring 2017

Spring 2019

Spring 2021

Tutored or taught other students (paid or voluntary)

Point scale (0 = Don’t Know, 1 = Never, 2 = Sometimes, 3 = Often, 4 = Very Often)

1.35

 

1.16

1.36

1.36

1.39

Spring 2017

Spring 2019

Spring 2021

Participated in a community-based project as part of your regular course

Point scale (0 = Don’t Know, 1 = Never, 2 = Sometimes, 3 = Often, 4 = Very Often)

1.32

 

1.30

1.40

1.29

1.35

Spring 2017

Spring 2019

Spring 2021

Discussed ideas from your readings or classes with others outside of class (students, family members, co-workers, etc.)

Point scale (0 = Don’t Know, 1 = Never, 2 = Sometimes, 3 = Often, 4 = Very Often)

2.42

 

2.57

3.16

2.38

2.54

Spring 2017

Spring 2019

Spring 2021

 

STUDENT EFFORT

Question/Item

Point Scale

ALL STUDENTS

AFRICAN AMERICAN

HISPANIC

WHITE

CCSSE BENCHMARK

Timeline for Assessment

Prepared two or more drafts of a paper or assignment before turning it in

Point scale (0 = Don’t Know, 1 = Never, 2 = Sometimes, 3 = Often, 4 = Very Often)

2.41

 

2.54

2.73

2.38

2.52

Spring 2017

Spring 2019

Spring 2021

Worked on a paper or project that required integrating ideas or information from various sources

Point scale (0 = Don’t Know, 1 = Never, 2 = Sometimes, 3 = Often, 4 = Very Often)

2.68

 

2.92

3.16

2.65

2.83

Spring 2017

Spring 2019

Spring 2021

Came to class without completing reading or assignments

Point scale (0 = Don’t Know, 1 = Never, 2 = Sometimes, 3 = Often, 4 = Very Often)

1.71

 

2.04

1.97

1.70

1.83

Spring 2017

Spring 2019

Spring 2021

How many hours a week did you spend preparing for class (studying, reading, writing, rehearsing, doing homework, or other activities related to your program)

Point scale (0 = None, 1 = 1 to 5, 2 = 6 to 10, 3 = 11 to 20, 4 = 21 to 30, 5 = More than 30)

1.90

 

1.77

2.48

1.88

2.00

Spring 2017

Spring 2019

Spring 2021

Frequency of use: Peer or other tutoring

Point scale (01 = Don’t know/NA, 1 = Rarely or Never, 2 = Sometimes, 3 = Often

1.41

 

1.53

1.39

1.42

1.53

Spring 2017

Spring 2019

Spring 2021

Frequency of use: Skill labs (writing, math, etc.)

Point scale (01 = Don’t know/NA, 1 = Rarely or Never, 2 = Sometimes, 3 = Often

1.79

 

2.29

1.81

1.75

1.75

Spring 2017

Spring 2019

Spring 2021

Frequency of use: Computer lab

Point scale (01 = Don’t know/NA, 1 = Rarely or Never, 2 = Sometimes, 3 = Often

2.07

 

2.29

2.61

2.02

2.06

Spring 2017

Spring 2019

Spring 2021

 

STUDENT-FACULTY INTERACTION

Question/Item

Point Scale

ALL STUDENTS

AFRICAN AMERICAN

HISPANIC

WHITE

CCSSE BENCHMARK

Timeline for Assessment

Used email to communicate with an instructor

Point scale (0 = Don’t Know, 1 = Never, 2 = Sometimes, 3 = Often, 4 = Very Often)

3.05

 

2.87

3.56

3.03

2.92

Spring 2017

Spring 2019

Spring 2021

Discussed grades or assignments with an instructor

Point scale (0 = Don’t Know, 1 = Never, 2 = Sometimes, 3 = Often, 4 = Very Often)

2.79

 

2.64

2.90

2.78

2.63

Spring 2017

Spring 2019

Spring 2021

Talked about career plans with an instructor or advisor

Point scale (0 = Don’t Know, 1 = Never, 2 = Sometimes, 3 = Often, 4 = Very Often)

2.33

 

2.48

2.08

2.32

2.15

Spring 2017

Spring 2019

Spring 2021

Discussed ideas from your readings or classes with instructors outside of class

Point scale (0 = Don’t Know, 1 = Never, 2 = Sometimes, 3 = Often, 4 = Very Often)

1.79

 

1.98

1.92

1.77

1.80

Spring 2017

Spring 2019

Spring 2021

Received prompt feedback (written or oral) from instructors on your performance

Point scale (0 = Don’t Know, 1 = Never, 2 = Sometimes, 3 = Often, 4 = Very Often)

 2.82

 

3.28

2.81

2.78

2.74

Spring 2017

Spring 2019

Spring 2021

Worked with instructors on activities other than coursework

Point scale (0 = Don’t Know, 1 = Never, 2 = Sometimes, 3 = Often, 4 = Very Often)

 1.53

 

1.72

1.87

1.50

1.48

Spring 2017

Spring 2019

Spring 2021

 

SUPPORT FOR LEARNERS

Question/Item

Point Scale

ALL STUDENTS

AFRICAN AMERICAN

HISPANIC

WHITE

CCSSE BENCHMARK

Timeline for Assessment

Providing the support you need to help you succeed at this college

4 points scale of 1 through 4 (1 = Very Little, 2 = Some, 3 = Quite a Bit, 4 = Very Much)

 3.11

 

3.28

3.56

3.07

3.04

Spring 2017

Spring 2019

Spring 2021

Encouraging contact among students from different economic, social, and racial or ethnic backgrounds

4 points scale of 1 through 4 (1 = Very Little, 2 = Some, 3 = Quite a Bit, 4 = Very Much)

 2.61

 

3.03

2.93

2.58

2.61

Spring 2017

Spring 2019

Spring 2021

Helping you cope with your non-academic responsibilities (work, family, etc.)

4 points scale of 1 through 4 (1 = Very Little, 2 = Some, 3 = Quite a Bit, 4 = Very Much)

 2.18

 

2.64

2.47

2.12

2.03

Spring 2017

Spring 2019

Spring 2021

Providing the support you need to thrive socially

4 points scale of 1 through 4 (1 = Very Little, 2 = Some, 3 = Quite a Bit, 4 = Very Much)

 2.34

 

2.65

2.52

2.31

2.24

Spring 2017

Spring 2019

Spring 2021

Providing the financial support you need to afford your education

4 points scale of 1 through 4 (1 = Very Little, 2 = Some, 3 = Quite a Bit, 4 = Very Much)

2.67

 

2.66

2.31

2.68

2.59

Spring 2017

Spring 2019

Spring 2021

Frequency: Academic advising/planning

Point scale (01 = Don’t know/NA, 1 = Rarely or Never, 2 = Sometimes, 3 = Often

 1.93

 

2.03

2.24

1.89

1.83

Spring 2017

Spring 2019

Spring 2021

Frequency: Career counseling

Point scale (01 = Don’t know/NA, 1 = Rarely or Never, 2 = Sometimes, 3 = Often

 1.39

 

1.53

1.78

1.35

1.45

Spring 2017

Spring 2019

Spring 2021

 

OTHER

Question/Item

Point Scale

ALL STUDENTS

AFRICAN AMERICAN

HISPANIC

WHITE

CCSSE BENCHMARK

Timeline for Assessment

How likely is it that the following issues would cause you to withdraw from class or this college?

Working full-time

Point scale (1 = Not likely, 2 = Somewhat likely, 3 = Likely, 4 = Very likely

--

2.30

2.08

2.15

--

Spring 2017

Spring 2019

Spring 2021

Caring for dependents

Point scale (1 = Not likely, 2 = Somewhat likely, 3 = Likely, 4 = Very likely

--

2.12

1.68

1.83

--

Spring 2017

Spring 2019

Spring 2021

Academically unprepared

Point scale (1 = Not likely, 2 = Somewhat likely, 3 = Likely, 4 = Very likely

--

2.04

1.66

1.51

--

Spring 2017

Spring 2019

Spring 2021

Lack of finances

Point scale (1 = Not likely, 2 = Somewhat likely, 3 = Likely, 4 = Very likely

--

2.46

2.68

2.36

--

Spring 2017

Spring 2019

Spring 2021

Transfer to a 4-year college or university

Point scale (1 = Not likely, 2 = Somewhat likely, 3 = Likely, 4 = Very likely

--

2.45

2.63

2.31

--

Spring 2017

Spring 2019

Spring 2021

About how many hours do you spend in a typical 7-day week doing the following?

Working for pay

Point scale (0= None, 1 = 1-5 hours, 2 = 6-10 hours, 3 = 11-20 hours, 4 = 21-30 hours, 5 = more than 30 hours)

--

3.70

2.48

3.65

--

Spring 2017

Spring 2019

Spring 2021

Participating in college-sponsored activities (organizations, campus publications, student government, intercollegiate or intramural sports)

Point scale (0= None, 1 = 1-5 hours, 2 = 6-10 hours, 3 = 11-20 hours, 4 = 21-30 hours, 5 = more than 30 hours)

--

0.27

0.06

0.22

--

Spring 2017

Spring 2019

Spring 2021

Providing care for dependents living with you (parents, children, spouse, etc.)

Point scale (0= None, 1 = 1-5 hours, 2 = 6-10 hours, 3 = 11-20 hours, 4 = 21-30 hours, 5 = more than 30 hours)

--

2.61

1.68

1.71

--

Spring 2017

Spring 2019

Spring 2021

Commuting to and from classes

Point scale (0= None, 1 = 1-5 hours, 2 = 6-10 hours, 3 = 11-20 hours, 4 = 21-30 hours, 5 = more than 30 hours)

--

1.34

1.76

1.28

--

Spring 2017

Spring 2019

Spring 2021

 

Find the full Diversity and Inclusion plan here.